Ebola (Part two)

As a follow up to the post of last week on the Ebola scare and making sure that you are well informed.

The CDC (Center for Disease Control) has released an “Interim Guidance for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Systems and 9-1-1 Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPs) for Management of Patients with Known or Suspected Ebola Virus Disease in the United States” web pages to help alleviate fears and generally give guidance about how to protect against the Ebola virus.

The page is a pretty comprehensive guide to what Ebola is and isn’t, how it is contracted and how to protect against it.

It is designed primarily for emergency personnel such as EMS and 911 responders but the information is applicable to everyone.

View the information here.


Get the Facts about Ebola

A few years back, Barry Glassner wrote “The Culture of Fear: Why Americans Are Afraid of the Wrong Things. It’s a good read and one that most of us could benefit from reading.

The premise of the book is that media is in the business of getting viewers. In order to do that, news has to be sensational and shocking. What this means is that they take a few isolated incidents and turn them into sensational news stories designed to frighten us so that we’ll keep tuning in to find out more.

I bring this up because of the Ebola scare going around right now.

The best way to calm the fears and put things into perspective is to get the facts. Just because a couple of people who were recently in Africa have contracted Ebola does not mean that we need to go into panic mode. The Ebola Virus Disease (EBD) is only contracted through bodily contact and transmitted through bodily fluids. It can also be contracted through contact with certain species of animals that are carriers (fruit bats, monkeys and apes notably) or by eating their raw meat. I don’t know about you but I haven’t eaten any raw fruit bat meat recently so I’m pretty sure I don’t have a lot to worry about on that count.

Get the facts on the Ebola Virus Disease from the World Health Organization website. Knowledge is power when it comes to not loosing sleep worrying about things like Ebola.


Personal Computer Safety Alert- Microsoft Help Desk callers- Social Engineering Scam

Avoid Microsoft tech support phone scams

Avoid Microsoft tech support phone scams- Some of our employees and local citizens have been receiving calls from people posing as Microsoft Help Desk employees. They are a social engineering scam trying to get access to your computer. Cybercriminals don’t just send fraudulent email messages and set up fake websites. They might also call you on the telephone and claim to be from Microsoft. If you receive a phone call claiming to be from ‘Microsoft’ or someone claiming to work on their behalf, telling you that you have a virus on your computer which they will help you fix over the phone, It Is A Scam. Hang up the phone, do not let them have remote control access to your computer and do not give them any money.

The scam goes like this;

• Householders receive an unsolicited phone call from someone claiming to be from ‘Microsoft’ and they are told that there is a serious virus problem with their computer and the caller offers to help to fix the problem.

• The householder will get the hard sell from the caller regarding all sorts of bad things that will happen to their computer if they do not sort out the problem immediately.

• To try to gain the unwitting householders trust, the caller will direct them to the Event Viewer in Windows which shows details about various hardware and Windows software issues. This Event Viewer is always full of messages, even on a healthy computer, but the caller will convince them that these are the warning signs of the impending disaster.

• When the caller has their trust, they ask the householder to go to a website and download a remote control program that will help them fix the problem. After downloading this, the caller will take control of the computer, the householder will see their mouse pointer move around while various programs and folders are opened. The caller will claim that they know exactly what the problem is and how to fix it.

• Then they will ask for credit card details for a piece of software that will supposedly remove the ‘virus’.

Customers should hopefully already have alarm bells ringing at the mention of credit card details and end the conversation. The software that they sell to fix the computer will do nothing except tell you every now and then that everything is fine, all viruses have been removed. But in reality, it could be downloading all sorts of malware to your computer.

However, part of the scam’s damage may already have been done when the customer downloaded the remote control software. This software could well have the capability to sit in the background for months or years, stealing personal information from the computer like bank login details and other personal details that could be used for identity theft purposes. These callers could also be using this software to infect your computer with real viruses and malware.

Quote from Microsoft:

“Microsoft takes the privacy and security of our customers and partners personal information very seriously. We are advising customers to treat all unsolicited phone calls with skepticism and not to provide any personal information to anyone over the phone or online. Anyone who receives an unsolicited call from someone claiming to be from Microsoft should hang up. We can assure you Microsoft does not make these kinds of calls.”

They might offer to help solve your computer problems or sell you a software license. Once they have access to your computer, they can do the following:

  • Trick you into installing malicious software that could capture sensitive data, such as online banking user names and passwords. They might also then charge you to remove this software.
  • Convince you to visit legitimate websites to download software that will allow them to take control of your computer remotely and adjust settings to leave your computer vulnerable.
  • Request credit card information so they can bill you for phony services.
  • Direct you to fraudulent websites and ask you to enter credit card and other personal or financial information there.

Neither Microsoft nor our partners make unsolicited phone calls (also known as cold calls) to charge you for computer security or software fixes. Cybercriminals often use publicly available phone directories, so they might know your name and other personal information when they call you. They might even guess what operating system you’re using. Once they’ve gained your trust, they might ask for your user name and password or ask you to go to a legitimate website (such as www.ammyy.com) to install software that will let them access your computer to fix it. Once you do this, your computer and your personal information are vulnerable.

Do not trust unsolicited calls. Do not provide any personal information.

Here are some of the organizations that cybercriminals claim to be from:

  • Windows Helpdesk
  • Windows Service Center
  • Microsoft Tech Support
  • Microsoft Support
  • Windows Technical Department Support Group
  • Microsoft Research and Development Team (Microsoft R & D Team)

Report phone scamsto your local law enforcement.

How to protect yourself from telephone tech support scams. If someone claiming to be from Microsoft tech support calls you:

  • Do not purchase any software or services.
  • Ask if there is a fee or subscription associated with the “service.” If there is, hang up.
  • Never give control of your computer to a third party unless you can confirm that it is a legitimate representative of a computer support team with whom you are already a customer.
  • Take the caller’s information down and immediately report it to your local authorities.
  • Never provide your credit card or financial information to someone claiming to be from Microsoft tech support.

What to do if you already gave information to a tech support person

If you think that you might have downloaded malware from a phone tech support scam website or allowed a cybercriminal to access your computer, take these steps:

  • Change your computer’s password, change the password on your main email account, and change the password for any financial accounts, especially your bank and credit card.
  • Scan your computer with the Microsoft Safety Scanner to find out if you have malware installed on your computer.
  • Install Microsoft Security Essentials. (Microsoft Security Essentials is a free program. If someone calls you to install this product and then charge you for it, this is also a scam.)

Note: In Windows 8, Windows Defender replaces Microsoft Security Essentials. Windows Defender runs in the background and notifies you when you need to take specific action. However, you can use it anytime to scan for malware if your computer isn’t working properly or you clicked a suspicious link online or in an email message.

Learn more about Windows Defender

Will Microsoft ever call me?

There are some cases where Microsoft will work with your Internet service provider and call you to fix a malware-infected computer—such as during the recent cleanup effort begun in our botnet takedown actions. These calls will be made by someone with whom you can verify you already are a customer. You will never receive a legitimate call from Microsoft or our partners to charge you for computer fixes.

More information

For more information about how to recognize a phishing scam, see Avoid scams that use the Microsoft name fraudulently. If you need help with a virus or other security problem, visit the Microsoft Virus and Security Solution Center.

Windows 8 includes antivirus protection that’s turned on by default.

Information from Microsoft and your Plateau ESG Group.

Today’s Post comes to us courtesy of Ken Oswald, Safety and Security Officer for Plateau

keno@plateautel.com


Health and Safety Alert- Respiratory Virus Enterovirus D68/EV-D68

ENTEROVIRUS D68/EV-D68

Hundreds of children across the United States have been hospitalized with a serious respiratory illness. Scientists say they believe the bug to blame is Enterovirus D68, also known as EV-D68. Enteroviruses are common, especially in September, but this particular type is not. There have been fewer than 100 cases recorded since it was identified in the 1960s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This respiratory virus is unusually high number of hospitalizations reported could be “just the tip of the iceberg in terms of severe cases,” said Mark Pallansch, a virologist and director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Viral Diseases. Ten states have contacted the CDC for assistance in investigating clusters of enterovirus: Colorado, North Carolina, Georgia, Ohio, Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma and Kentucky. Four — Colorado, Illinois, Missouri and Iowa — have confirmed cases of Enterovirus D68, also known as EV-D68. The CDC confirmed that samples it tested from children who had been hospitalized in Illinois and in Kansas City, Missouri, did show signs of the EV-D68 virus, meaning there is a possible regional outbreak.

Enteroviruses, which bring on symptoms like a very intense cold, aren’t unusual.”It’s important to remember that these infections are very common,” said Dr. Anne Schuchat. Schuchat is the assistant surgeon general for the U.S. Public Health Service and the director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. When you have a bad summer cold, often what you have is an enterovirus. The CDC estimates there are 10 to 15 million viral infections each year in the United States. The season often hits its peak in September.

This particular type of enterovirus — EV-D68 — is uncommon but not new. It was identified in the 1960s, and there have been fewer than 100 reported cases since that time. But it’s possible that the relatively low number of reports might be because EV-D68 is hard to identify. EV-D68 was seen last year in the United States and this year in various parts of the world. Over the years, clusters have been reported in Georgia, Pennsylvania, Arizona and various countries including the Philippines, Japan and the Netherlands.

The reason health officials are concerned this year is that there have been so many hospitalizations. That’s the scary part — the unpredictability.

What are the symptoms?

Most people who are infected with non-polio enteroviruses do not get sick, or they only have mild illness. Symptoms of mild illness may include:

•fever

•runny nose, sneezing, cough

•skin rash

•mouth blisters

•body and muscle aches

Some non-polio enterovirus infections can cause

•viral conjunctivitis,

•hand, foot, and mouth disease,

•viral meningitis (infection of the covering of the spinal cord and/or brain).

Less commonly, a person may develop:

•myocarditis (infection of the heart)

•pericarditis (infection of the sac around the heart)

•encephalitis (infection of the brain)

•paralysis

People who develop myocarditis may have heart failure and require long term care. Some people who develop encephalitis or paralysis may not fully recover.

Newborns infected with non-polio enterovirus may develop sepsis (infection of the blood and other organs). But this is very rare.

The virus can start as just a cold. Signs include coughing, difficulty breathing and in some cases a rash. Sometimes they can be accompanied by fever or wheezing. Respiratory problems appear to the hallmark of EV-D68, according to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. “Most enteroviruses cause either a little bit of a cold or a diarrheal illness — a few cause meningitis,” said Schaffner. “This one is the, if you will, odd cousin. It causes prominent respiratory symptoms. Why it does that, we’re really not sure.”

What parents should know about EV-D68

The virus has sent more than 30 children a day to a Kansas City, Missouri, hospital, where about 15% of the youngsters were placed in intensive care, officials said. In Kansas City, about 475 children were recently treated at Children’s Mercy Hospital, and at least 60 of them received intensive hospitalization, spokesman Jake Jacobson said. Vaccines for EV-D68 aren’t currently available, and there is no specific treatment for infections, the Missouri agency said.

“Many infections will be mild and self-limited, requiring only symptomatic treatment,” it said. “Some people with several respiratory illness caused by EV-D68 may need to be hospitalized and receive intensive supportive therapy.” Some cases of the virus might contribute to death, but none of the Missouri cases resulted in death, and no data are available for overall morbidity and mortality from the virus in the United States, the agency said.

Symptoms include coughing, difficulty breathing and rash. Sometimes they can be accompanied by fever or wheezing. The majority of the children who have been hospitalized with the virus, at least on the samples the CDC tested, did have asthma to start with. The virus made their symptoms worse.

Risk of infection and means of transmission

Non-polio enteroviruses can be found in an infected person’s

· eyes, nose, and mouth secretions (such as saliva, nasal mucus, or sputum), or

· blister fluid.

You can get exposed to the virus by—

· having close contact, such as touching or shaking hands, with an infected person,

· touching objects or surfaces that have the virus on them,

· changing diapers of an infected person, or

· drinking water that has the virus in it.

If you then touch your eyes, nose, or mouth before washing your hands, you can get infected with the virus and become sick.

Pregnant women who are infected with non-polio enterovirus shortly before delivery can pass the virus to their babies.

What can be done to prevent it?

Like other enteroviruses, the respiratory illness appears to spread through close contact with infected people. That makes children more susceptible.There’s not a great deal you can do, health officials say, beyond taking commonsense steps to reduce the risk.

· Wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds — particularly after going to the bathroom and changing diapers.

· Clean and disinfect surfaces that are regularly touched by different people, such as toys and doorknobs.

· Avoid shaking hands, kissing, hugging and sharing cups or eating utensils with people who are sick. And stay home if you feel unwell.

There’s no vaccine for EV-D68.

 


 

Today’s post comes to us courtesy of Ken Oswald, Safety and Security for Plateau

keno@plateautel.com


MERS Virus Warning

MIDDLE EAST RESPIRATORY SYNDROME (MERS) Virus now in United States

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is viral respiratory illness first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012. It is caused by a Coronavirus called MERS-CoV. Most people who have been confirmed to have MERS-CoV infection developed severe acute respiratory illness. They had fever, cough, and shortness of breath. More than 30% of these people died.This virus has spread from ill people to others through close contact, such as caring for or living with an infected person. However, there is no evidence of sustained spreading in community settings. As of Friday, 538 cases of MERS have been confirmed in 17 countries, including the United States, according to the World Health Organization. Of those, 145 people have died.

MERS is in the same family of viruses as SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome — coronavirus) as well as the common cold. However, unlike SARS, which sickened more than 8,000 people in 2003 and killed 773 worldwide, MERS does not spread easily between humans — at least not yet. On May 2, 2014, the first U.S. case of MERS was confirmed in a traveler from Saudi Arabia to the U.S. The traveler is considered to be fully recovered and has been released from the hospital. Public health officials have contacted healthcare workers, family members, and travelers who had close contact with the patient. At this time, none of these contacts has had evidence of being infected with MERS-CoV.

On May 11, 2014, a second U.S. imported case of MERS was confirmed in a traveler who also came to the U.S. from Saudi Arabia. This patient is currently hospitalized and doing well. People who had close contact with this patient are being contacted. The two U.S. cases are not linked. CDC and other public health partners continue to investigate and respond to the changing situation to prevent the spread of MERS-CoV in the U.S. These two cases of MERS imported to the U.S. represent a very low risk to the general public in this country.

CDC continues to closely monitor the MERS situation globally and work with partners to better understand the risks of this virus, including the source, how it spreads, and how infections might be prevented. The virus acts like a cold and attacks the respiratory system, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said. But symptoms, which include fever and a cough, are severe and can lead to pneumonia and kidney failure. Gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea have also been seen,CDC recognizes the potential for MERS-CoV to spread further and cause more cases globally and in the U.S. We have provided information for travelers and are working with health departments, hospitals, and other partners to prepare for this.

There are no treatments and no vaccine

As of now, doctors can treat symptoms of MERS, such as fever or breathing difficulties. However, there is no vaccine and no specific medicine, such as an antiviral drug, that targets MERS.

New Mexico Department of Health is asking that healthcare providers, infection preventionists and laboratorians be alert for and evaluate patients who meet the following:

  • Developed severe acute lower respiratory illness within 14 days after traveling from countries in or near the Arabian peninsula (e.g., Saudia Arabia, United Arab Emirates (UAE), Qatar, Oman, Jordan, Kuwait); OR
  • Close contacts of a recent traveler from this area who has fever and acute respiratory illness; OR
  • Close contacts of a confirmed case

Clusters of patients with severe acute respiratory illness (e.g., fever and pneumonia requiring hospitalization), without recognized connections to patients with MERS-CoV or to travelers from the Arabian Peninsula and surrounding areas, should be evaluated for common respiratory pathogens.

 

Additional information can be found in the MERS-CoV Risk Assessment document provided by the World Health Organization (WHO).

Information from the CDC, World Health Organization and NMDOH

 

Today’s post comes to us courtesy of Ken Oswald, Safety and Security Manager for Plateau

keno@plateautel.com


West Nile Virus Awareness and Tips

West Nile Virus Awareness

The US state of Texas is battling an outbreak of the West Nile virus, with 27 deaths being blamed on the mosquito-borne disease, authorities said Wednesday Aug 15th.Throughout the state, 650 + people have been sickened since the start of the year, according to the Texas Department of State Health Services.

You may have started to notice more of those swarming mosquitos flying around. A single mosquito bite can give you West Nile virus (WNV). Improve your odds of avoiding it, use repellant.

Although many people who are bitten by an infected mosquito wont get sick, others aren’t as lucky. Almost 33,000 people in the US have been reported with WNV disease since 1999, and of those 15,000 have been seriously ill and over 1,200 have died. The older you are, the more likely that you could get severely ill if you get infected. People who have ever received an organ transplant are also at higher risk for severe disease. The reasons a person becomes severely ill and another doesn’t, is unknown. There has already been multiple confirmed cases of WNV in Texas and New Mexico in 2012.

What Can I Do to Prevent WNV?
The easiest and best way to avoid WNV is to prevent mosquito bites.

  • Many mosquitoes are most active at dusk and dawn. Be sure to use insect repellent and wear long sleeves and pants at these times or consider staying indoors during these hours.
  • If possible, schedule your activities to avoid the times when mosquitoes are most active, usually dawn and dusk

· Keeping a deck or porch mosquito-free is quite easy, Strategically placed floor fans providing a breeze across the area of concern will serve to keep the mosquitoes at bay,. Mosquitoes are weak fliers, and will not be able to navigate properly against or within the airstream. There is no set formula for how large a fan or how many you’ll need; it’s simply a matter of experimenting until you obtain the desired effect.

· If you have a deck, light it using yellow Bug Lights. These lights are not repellant, per se, but they do not attract mosquitoes like incandescent white lights. By the way, citronella candles have a mild repellent effect, but do not offer significantly more protection than other candles producing smoke.

· Dress in light colored, loose-fitting clothing. Close-weave is the best to prevent biting, but layered loose-weave works almost as well.

· CDC evaluation of information contained in peer-reviewed scientific literature and data available from EPA has identified several EPA registered products that provide repellent activity sufficient to help people avoid the bites of disease carrying mosquitoes. Products containing these active ingredients typically provide reasonably long-lasting protection:

  • DEET (Chemical Name: N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide or N,N-diethly-3-methyl-benzamide)
  • Picaridin (KBR 3023, Chemical Name: 2-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperidinecarboxylic acid 1-methylpropyl ester )
  • Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus* or PMD (Chemical Name: para-Menthane-3,8-diol) the synthesized version of oil of lemon eucalyptus
  • IR3535 (Chemical Name: 3-[N-Butyl-N-acetyl]-aminopropionic acid, ethyl ester)

· You might have heard about products marketed as mosquito traps. These devices will trap and kill measurable numbers of mosquitoes. Depends whether it would produce a noticeable reduction in the mosquito population would depend on a variety of factors, including how sensitive you are how many mosquitoes there are, and even wind velocity.

What Is West Nile Virus?
West Nile virus (WNV) is a potentially serious illness. Experts believe WNV is established as a seasonal epidemic in North America that flares up in the summer and continues into the fall.

What Are the Symptoms of WNV?

  • Serious Symptoms in a Few People. About one in 150 people infected with WNV will develop severe illness. The severe symptoms can include high fever, headache, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, vision loss, numbness and paralysis. These symptoms may last several weeks, and neurological effects may be permanent.
  • Milder Symptoms in Some People. Up to 20 percent of the people who become infected have symptoms such as fever, headache, and body aches, nausea, vomiting, and sometimes swollen lymph glands or a skin rash on the chest, stomach and back. Symptoms can last for as short as a few days, though even healthy people have become sick for several weeks.
  • No Symptoms in Most People. Approximately 80 percent of people (about 4 out of 5) who are infected with WNV will not show any symptoms at all.

How Does West Nile Virus Spread?

  • Infected Mosquitoes. Most often, WNV is spread by the bite of an infected mosquito. Mosquitoes become infected when they feed on infected birds. Infected mosquitoes can then spread WNV to humans and other animals when they bite.
  • Transfusions, Transplants, and Mother-to-Child. In a very small number of cases, WNV also has been spread through blood transfusions, organ transplants, breastfeeding and even during pregnancy from mother to baby.
  • Not through touching. WNV is not spread through casual contact such as touching or kissing a person with the virus.

How Soon Do Infected People Get Sick?
People typically develop symptoms between 3 and 14 days after they are bitten by the infected mosquito.

How Is WNV Infection Treated?
There is no specific treatment for WNV infection. In cases with milder symptoms, people experience symptoms such as fever and aches that pass on their own, although even healthy people have become sick for several weeks. In more severe cases, people usually need to go to the hospital where they can receive supportive treatment including intravenous fluids, help with breathing and nursing care.

What Should I Do if I Think I Have WNV?
Milder WNV illness improves on its own, and people do not necessarily need to seek medical attention for this infection though they may choose to do so. If you develop symptoms of severe WNV illness, such as unusually severe headaches or confusion, seek medical attention immediately. Severe WNV illness usually requires hospitalization. Pregnant women and nursing mothers are encouraged to talk to their doctor if they develop symptoms that could be WNV.

What Is the Risk of Getting Sick from WNV?

People over 50 at higher risk to get severe illness. People over the age of 50 are more likely to develop serious symptoms of WNV if they do get sick and should take special care to avoid mosquito bites.


Being outside means you’re at risk.
The more time you’re outdoors, the more time you could be bitten by an infected mosquito. Pay attention to avoiding mosquito bites if you spend a lot of time outside, either working or playing.


Risk through medical procedures is very low.
All donated blood is checked for WNV before being used. The risk of getting WNV through blood transfusions and organ transplants is very small, and should not prevent people who need surgery from having it. If you have concerns, talk to your doctor.

1999-2011 West Nile Virus Activity in the United States

CURRENT WEST NILE POSITIVE TEST RESULTS AS OF July 2012

States and counties in yellow either did not perform surveillance or did not report any positive test results from their surveillance.

*Above Chart does not reflect NMDOH confirmed WNV cases in NM Bernalillo and Sandoval counties in late July and August 2012

In 2011 New Mexico had 4 cases of West Nile virus infection, all with serious neuroinvasive disease. In 2010, there were 25 confirmed cases of West Nile virus infection in New Mexico, 21 with neuroinvasive disease and 1 fatality.

For more information about West Nile Virus, including fact sheets in English and Spanish, go to the Departments website at http://nmhealth.org/ERD/HealthData/westnile.shtml.

Where is West Nile virus a problem? Almost all of the continental US has had human WNV cases. Some areas, such as those with the red dots on the map to the right, have a greater concentration of cases of severe disease than other areas. Some areas of the US are affected by other viruses such as eastern equine encephalitis virus and Lacrosse encephalitis virus.

What about mosquito control in my town/county? Integrated mosquito management helps reduce the number of mosquitoes, especially those that can carry disease. This is a crucial part of reducing the risk to humans. Mosquito control won’t get rid of every last mosquito, but combined with repellent use one can markedly reduce the chances of getting bitten. Ask local officials about starting mosquito control in your city or county if it doesn’t exist already.

What can I do to reduce my risk of becoming infected with West Nile virus?

A. Here are preventive measures that you and your family can take:

Protect yourself from mosquito bites:

  • Apply insect repellent to exposed skin. Generally, the more active ingredient a repellent contains the longer it can protect you from mosquito bites. A higher percentage of active ingredients in a repellent do not mean that your protection is betterjust that it will last longer. Choose a repellent that provides protection for the amount of time that you will be outdoors.
    • Repellents may irritate the eyes and mouth, so avoid applying repellent to the hands of children.
    • Whenever you use an insecticide or insect repellent, be sure to read and follow the manufacturer’s DIRECTIONS FOR USE, as printed on the product.
  • Spray clothing with repellents containing permethrin or another EPA-registered repellent since mosquitoes may bite through thin clothing. Do not apply repellents containing permethrin directly to exposed skin. When weather permits, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants whenever you are outdoors.
  • Place mosquito netting over infant carriers when you are outdoors with infants.
  • Consider staying indoors at dawn, dusk, and in the early evening, which are peak mosquito biting times.
  • Install or repair window and door screens so that mosquitoes cannot get indoors.

Help reduce the number of mosquitoes in areas outdoors where you work or play, by draining sources of standing water. In this way, you reduce the number of places mosquitoes can lay their eggs and breed.

  • At least once or twice a week, empty water from flower pots, pet food and water dishes, birdbaths, swimming pool covers, buckets, barrels, and cans.
  • Check for clogged rain gutters and clean them out.
  • Remove discarded tires, and other items that could collect water.
  • Be sure to check for containers or trash in places that may be hard to see, such as under bushes or under your home.

Note: Vitamin B and “ultrasonic” devices are NOT effective in preventing mosquito bites.

Something to remember: The chance that any one person is going to become ill from a single mosquito bite remains low. The risk of severe illness and death is highest for people over 50 years old, although people of all ages can become ill.

More questions about mosquito control? A source for information about pesticides and repellents is the National Pesticide Information Center, which also operates a toll-free information line: 1-800-858-7378 (check their Web site for hours).

Information provided by the CDC, NMDOH, TXDOH and National Pesticide Information Center.

Todays’ post comes to use courtesy of Ken Oswald

Safety and Security Manager for Plateau

keno@plateautel.com