Understanding What Sunscreen Does and Doesn’t Do

I don’t know about the weather where you live but here in Western Washington where I live we’ve seen record high temperatures and more than enough sun to last us all summer (yes, there are plenty of us here in Washington bemoaning the lack of rain). With all this sun, we’ve already seen our fair share of sunburn and this is because many people still don’t understand what sunscreen is and what it does.

Let’s start with the basics. SPF stands for Sun Protection Factor. The Sun Protection Factor number is telling you how much longer you can stay out in the sun than you could if you weren’t wearing any sunscreen at all. An SPF of 15, for example, is letting you know that, if you normally can stay out in the sun for 30 minutes without sunburn or damage to your skin, with SPF 15 sunscreen you will be able to stay out 15 times longer, that is to say 7.5 hours. Increase the SPF to 30 and you should be okay for 15 hours. SPF 15 blocks 93% of the UVB rays which means that out of every 100 photon bombarding your skin 93 will be blocked while 7 will get through. SPF 30 blocks 97%.

SunX_4oz_lotion

Sounds pretty logical and straightforward, right? Not really! The problem is that most of us don’t really apply the sunscreen properly. Most of us, according to a numerous studies, only apply 1/5 to 1/2 of the amount that the manufacturer recommends (After all, we reason, of course they want me to apply lots of sunscreen, that way they can sell more!). If you apply only 1/5 of the amount of sunscreen with a protection factor of 15, you end up with a protection of only 3 rather than 15 so that now, instead of being able to stay out in the sun for 7.5 hours you will now begin to suffer damage to your skin after only 1.5 hours.

Additionally, while you may not suffer sunburn which happens because of UVB, your skin can still suffer damage (which can cause skin cancer, aging, leathering, sagging and more) if the sunscreen doesn’t protect from UVA as well. Make sure that your sunscreen contains zinc oxide, avobenzone, titanium dioxide, ecamsule and oxybenzone for maximum protection.

Three more items of note… First, don’t rely on sunscreen if you don’t have to. Short exposures to the sun are best. Sun does provide our bodies with Vitamin D which is necessary for health so try to get some exposure but keep it under 30 minutes. If you absolutely must stay out in the sun, apply sunscreen. Secondly, be aware of the fact that sunscreen does deteriorate over time and that the sunscreen you purchased last year isn’t going to protect you as well this year and certainly not as well next year. Thirdly, don’t go tanning. Tanning will prematurely age your skin and expose you to harmful UV rays. A tan, which most people associate with health is actually the opposite. Brown skin is skin that is already damaged.

 





July is UV Awareness Month

July is UV Awareness Month

Protection from sun exposure is important all year round, not just during the summer or at the beach. Ultraviolet (UV) rays can reach you on cloudy and hazy days, as well as bright and sunny days. UV rays also reflect off of surfaces like water, cement, sand, and snow. UV is also being used now in Gel Manicures to get the nails to harden for those that like to have their nails done at a nail salon. UV has been linked directly to causing Skin cancer.

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types of skin cancer—basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas—are highly curable. However, melanoma, the third most common skin cancer, is more dangerous. About 65%–90% of melanomas are caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light.

The hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. daylight savings time (9 a.m. to 3 p.m. standard time) are the most hazardous for UV exposure in the continental United States. UV rays are the greatest during the late spring and early summer in North America.

Ultraviolet (UV) Light

Ultraviolet (UV) rays are an invisible kind of radiation that comes from the sun, tanning beds, and sunlamps. UV rays can penetrate and change skin cells.

The three types of UV rays are ultraviolet A (UVA), ultraviolet B (UVB), and ultraviolet C (UVC)—

  • UVA is the most common kind of sunlight at the earth’s surface, and reaches beyond the top layer of human skin. Scientists believe that UVA rays can damage connective tissue and increase a person’s risk of skin cancer.
  • Most UVB rays are absorbed by the ozone layer, so they are less common at the earth’s surface than UVA rays. UVB rays don’t reach as far into the skin as UVA rays, but they can still be damaging.
  • UVC rays are very dangerous, but they are absorbed by the ozone layer and do not reach the ground.

Too much exposure to UV rays can change skin texture, cause the skin to age prematurely, and can lead to skin cancer. UV rays also have been linked to eye conditions such as cataracts.

What are the facts and is this a threat to me?

  • Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the U.S.
  • Over 2 million people are diagnosed annually
  • Many people die of skin cancer every year
  • Sunburns are a high risk factor of skin cancer

“I don’t think I’m at risk, so I don’t need to protect myself…”
The following people are at an even greater risk of getting skin damage or skin cancer: African Americans, Asians, and fair skinned people with moles or freckles. People with blue eyes, blonde or red hair have the greatest risk. BUT don’t be fooled everyone has risks!

BE SUN AWARE

How do I protect myself in this hot sun?
The UV Index for New Mexico and West Texas ranges from a 7-13 on any given summer day. This means that the risk of UV exposure is in the ‘very high’ to ‘extreme’ range.

Shade

You can reduce your risk of skin damage and skin cancer by seeking shade under an umbrella, tree, or other shelter before you need relief from the sun. Your best bet to protect your skin is to use sunscreen or wear protective clothing when you’re outside—even when you’re in the shade.

Clothing

Loose-fitting long-sleeved shirts and long pants made from tightly woven fabric offer the best protection from the sun’s UV rays. A wet T-shirt offers much less UV protection than a dry one. Darker colors may offer more protection than lighter colors.

If wearing this type of clothing isn’t practical, at least try to wear a T-shirt or a beach cover-up. Keep in mind that a typical T-shirt has an SPF rating lower than 15, so use other types of protection as well.

Hats

For the most protection, wear a hat with a brim all the way around that shades your face, ears, and the back of your neck. A tightly woven fabric, such as canvas, works best to protect your skin from UV rays. Avoid straw hats with holes that let sunlight through. A darker hat may offer more UV protection.

If you wear a baseball cap, you should also protect your ears and the back of your neck by wearing clothing that covers those areas, using sunscreen with at least SPF 15, or by staying in the shade.

Sunglasses

Sunglasses protect your eyes from UV rays and reduce the risk of cataracts. They also protect the tender skin around your eyes from sun exposure.

Sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays offer the best protection. Most sunglasses sold in the United States, regardless of cost, meet this standard. Wrap-around sunglasses work best because they block UV rays from sneaking in from the side.

Sunscreen

The sun’s UV rays can damage your skin in as little as 15 minutes. Put on sunscreen before you go outside, even on slightly cloudy or cool days. Don’t forget to put a thick layer on all parts of exposed skin. Get help for hard-to-reach places like your back.

How sunscreen works. Most sun protection products work by absorbing, reflecting, or scattering sunlight. They contain chemicals that interact with the skin to protect it from UV rays. All products do not have the same ingredients; if your skin reacts badly to one product, try another one or call a doctor.

SPF. Sunscreens are assigned a sun protection factor (SPF) number that rates their effectiveness in blocking UV rays. Higher numbers indicate more protection. You should use a sunscreen with at least SPF 15.

Reapplication. Sunscreen wears off. Put it on again if you stay out in the sun for more than two hours and after you swim or do things that make you sweat.

Expiration date. Check the sunscreen’s expiration date. Sunscreen without an expiration date has a shelf life of no more than three years, but its shelf life is shorter if it has been exposed to high temperatures.

Cosmetics. Some make-up and lip balms contain some of the same chemicals used in sunscreens. If they do not have at least SPF 15, don’t use them by themselves.

The National Weather Service and EPA advise people to regularly check the UV Index, which they developed as a way to predict the next day’s UV radiation levels on a 1-11+ scale, helping people determine appropriate sun-protective behaviors. EPA will issue a UV Alert when the level of solar UV radiation is predicted to be unusually high and the risk of overexposure is consequently greater.

Also at the EPA site (www.epa.gov), you can check the UV Index forecast map, which shows

contour lines of predicted UV Index values during the solar noon hour. The map is created daily

from National Weather Service forecast data. Here are the recommended Sun Protective measures for each exposure category.

Exposure
Category
Index Number Sun Protection Messages
LOW <2 You can safely enjoy being outside. Wear sunglasses on bright days. If you burn easily, cover up and use sunscreen SPF 15+.In winter, reflections off snow can nearly double UV strength.
MODERATE 3-5 Take precautions if you will be outside, such as wearing a hat and sunglasses and using sunscreen SPF 15+. Reduce your exposure to the sun’s most intense UV radiation by seeking shade during midday hours.
HIGH 6-7 Protection against sun damage is needed. Wear a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, use sunscreen SPF 15+ and wear a long-sleeved shirt and pants when practical. Reduce your exposure to the sun’s most intense UV radiation by seeking shade during midday hours.
VERY HIGH 8-10 Protection against sun damage is needed. If you need to be outside during midday hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., take steps to reduce sun exposure. A shirt, hat and sunscreen are a must, and be sure you seek shade.Beachgoers should know that white sand and other bright surfaces reflect UV and can double UV exposure.
EXTREME 11+ Protection against sun damage is needed. If you need to be outside during midday hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., take steps to reduce sun exposure. A shirt, hat and sunscreen are a must, and be sure you seek shade.Beachgoers should know that white sand and other bright surfaces reflect UV and can double UV exposure.

Regardless of the UV Index, the following sun safety measures are encouraged:· Do Not Burn.· Generously Apply Sunscreen to all exposed skin using a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 15 that provides broad-spectrum protection from both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. Re-apply every two hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating.

· Wear Protective Clothing, such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, where possible.

· Seek Shade when appropriate, remembering that the sun’s UV rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

· Use Extra Caution near Water, Snow and Sand as they reflect the damaging rays of the sun which can increase your chance of sunburn.

· Watch for the UV Index (See chart above).

· Get Vitamin D Safely through a diet that includes vitamin supplements.

Early detection of melanoma can save your life. Carefully examine ALL of your skin once a month. A new or changing mole should be evaluated by a dermatologist. Have fun in the sun this summer, but remember to use all the UV protection possible.

Sign up and contact me to find out more about UV safety and skin cancer with our Wednesday Wellness class July 10 with Dr. Mac of the Clovis Cancer Center.

Information provided by EPA, NOAA and American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Today’s post comes to us courtesy of Ken Oswald, Safety and Security Manager for Plateau

keno@plateautel.com


Children in hot cars can suffer brain damage

With spring and summer just around the corner, it’s perhaps time to remind ourselves about the dangers represented by vehicles left in the sun, especially with children inside.

Studies have shown that the temperature inside a vehicle can rapidly rise to extremely dangerous levels. Children’s bodies are much more sensitive than adults bodies and their temperatures can rise 3 to 5 times faster (it’s a question of body mass. A chicken cooks faster than a turkey… no nasty insinuations intended). The effects on the child’s body can be disastrous with severe dehydration, seizures, brain damage and eventually death.

So here are the safety rules once again:

1. Never leave a child alone, unattended in a vehicle. NEVER! Even if you are just going to be 2 seconds (or so you think) take the child with you.

2. Make it a habit to always have your keys in your hands when you get out of the car. It’s just too easy to accidentally lock your keys in the car and if your child is strapped in his car seat he’s going to be in harm’s way by the time you get the vehicle unlocked.

3. Have a spare key somewhere you can get at it fast (magnetic key holder, wheel well, etc…) just in case safety rules # 2 fails. Especially if you have small children or consistently drive small children around, make sure you have a spare key somewhere where you can get to it fast if you accidentally lock your keys in your car.

4. When stopping for gas, pay at the pump. Take out a gas station credit card or do whatever you have to do to make sure you don’t have to go into the gas station to pay while leaving the child in the car.

5. Do not leave your vehicle unlocked when at home. Even if it isn’t a matter of protecting your car from burglars, it’s too easy for children to climb in an unlocked vehicle and end up locking themselves in. By the time you figure out what has happened, it might be too late. Always keep your car locked.

What about if you notice a child alone and unattended inside a vehicle?

1. call 911. They will ask about the vehicles’ license plate, the age of the child, the apparent condition of the child.

2. if the vehicle isn’t locked, open the doors to get air circulating. Provide shade for the child with a blanket, sunshade or coat until emergency services get there. If the child appears to be in distress, remove the child from the vehicle and stay close until emergency services arrive.


July UV Safety Awareness Month

July is UV Safety Month

The National Weather Service and EPA advise people to regularly check the UV Index, which they developed as a way to predict the next day’s UV radiation levels on a 1-11+ scale, helping people determine appropriate sun-protective behaviors. EPA will issue a UV Alert when the level of solar UV radiation is predicted to be unusually high and the risk of overexposure is consequently greater.

Also at the EPA site (www.epa.gov), you can check the UV Index forecast map, which shows contour lines of predicted UV Index values during the solar noon hour. The map is created daily from National Weather Service forecast data.

Here are the recommended Sun Protective measures for each exposure category.

Exposure                  Index                      Sun Protection Messages
Category                   Number

Low  ( <2 ) You can safely enjoy being outside. Wear sunglasses on bright days. If you burn
easily, cover up and use sunscreen SPF 15+. In winter, reflections off snow can nearly double UV strength.

Moderate  (3-5)  Take precautions if you will be outside, such as wearing a hat and sunglasses and
using  sunscreen SPF 15+. Reduce your exposure to the sun’s most intense UV radiation by seeking shade during midday
hours.

High (6-7) Protection against sun damage is needed. Wear a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses,
use sunscreen SPF 15+ and wear a long-sleeved shirt and pants when practical. Reduce your exposure to the sun’s most
intense UV radiation by seeking shade during midday hours.

Very High (8-10) Protection against sun damage is needed. If you need to be outside during midday hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., take steps to reduce sun exposure. A shirt, hat and sunscreen are a must, and be sure you seek shade. Beach-goers should know that white sand and other bright surfaces reflect UV and can double UV exposure.

Extreme (11+) Protection against sun damage is needed. If you need to be outside during midday hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., take steps to reduce sun exposure. A shirt, hat and sunscreen are a must, and be sure you seek shade.Beachgoers should know that white sand and other bright surfaces reflect UV and can double UV exposure.

Regardless of the UV Index, the following sun safety measures are encouraged:· Do Not Burn.· Generously Apply Sunscreen to all exposed skin using a Sun protection Factor (SPF) of at least 15 that provides broad-spectrum protection from both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. Re-apply every two hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating.· Wear Protective Clothing, such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, where possible.

· Seek Shade when appropriate, remembering that the sun’s UV rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

· Use Extra Caution near Water, Snow and Sand as they reflect the damaging rays of the sun which can increase your chance of sunburn.

· Watch for the UV Index (See chart above).

· Get Vitamin D Safely through a diet that includes vitamin supplements.

Early detection of melanoma can save your life. Carefully examine ALL of your skin once a month. A new or changing mole should be evaluated by a dermatologist. Have fun in the sun this summer, but remember to use all the UV protection possible.

Today’s post comes to us courtesy of Ken Oswald

Safety and Security Manager for Plateau

keno@plateautel.com


This is why you should wear sunscreen

I came across this photo on the New England Journal of Medicine website the other day:

This is a 69-year old man who drove a truck 28 years. You can clearly see the difference between the left side which was exposed to the sunlight and the right side which was inside the cab. “The physical examination showed hyperkeratosis with accentuated ridging, multiple open comedones, and areas of nodular elastosis. Histopathological analysis showed an accumulation of elastolytic material in the dermis and the formation of milia within the vellus hair follicles. Findings were consistent with the FavreRacouchot syndrome of photodamaged skin, known as dermatoheliosis. “

One additional note, pay attention to the expiration date on your sunscreen. Old sunscreen does not protect properly. A friend of mine found this out the hard way when she and her children got sunburned in spite of having put on sunscreen because the sunscreen she used was several of years old (we live in WA state where a bottle of sunscreen goes a long way). Most sunscreens have a 3-year shelf life but there are many factors that could possibly shorten that so if in doubt, get a new bottle… your skin and health is worth it.


Skin Cancer Awareness and Prevention

Skin Cancer Awareness and Prevention

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types of skin cancer—basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas—are highly curable. However, melanoma, the third most common skin cancer, is more dangerous. About 65%–90% of melanomas are caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light

Protection from sun exposure is important all year round, not just during the summer or at the beach. Ultraviolet (UV) rays can reach you on cloudy and hazy days, as well as bright and sunny days. UV rays also reflect off of surfaces like water, cement, sand, and snow.

The hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. daylight savings time (9 a.m. to 3 p.m. standard time) are the most hazardous for UV exposure in the continental United States. UV rays are the greatest during the late spring and early summer in North America.


Ultraviolet (UV) Light

Ultraviolet (UV) rays are an invisible kind of radiation that comes from the sun, tanning beds, and sunlamps. UV rays can penetrate and change skin cells.

The three types of UV rays are ultraviolet A (UVA), ultraviolet B (UVB), and ultraviolet C (UVC)—

  • UVA is the most common kind of sunlight at the earth’s surface, and reaches beyond the top layer of human skin. Scientists believe that UVA rays can damage connective tissue and increase a person’s risk of skin cancer.
  • Most UVB rays are absorbed by the ozone layer, so they are less common at the earth’s surface than UVA rays. UVB rays don’t reach as far into the skin as UVA rays, but they can still be damaging.
  • UVC rays are very dangerous, but they are absorbed by the ozone layer and do not reach the ground.

Too much exposure to UV rays can change skin texture, cause the skin to age prematurely, and can lead to skin cancer. UV rays also have been linked to eye conditions such as cataracts.

UV Index

The National Weather Service and the Environmental Protection Agency developed the UV Index to forecast the risk of overexposure to UV rays. It lets you know how much caution you should take when working, playing, or exercising outdoors.

The UV Index predicts exposure levels on a 1–15 scale; higher levels indicate a higher risk of overexposure. Calculated on a next-day basis for dozens of cities across the United States, the UV Index takes into account clouds and other local conditions that affect the amount of UV rays reaching the ground.

Exposure
Category

Index Number

Sun Protection Messages

LOW

<2

You can safely enjoy being outside. Wear sunglasses on bright days. If you burn easily, cover up and use sunscreen SPF 15+.

In winter, reflections off snow can nearly double UV strength.

MODERATE

3-5

Take precautions if you will be outside, such as wearing a hat and sunglasses and using sunscreen SPF 15+. Reduce your exposure to the sun’s most intense UV radiation by seeking shade during midday hours.

HIGH

6-7

Protection against sun damage is needed. Wear a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, use sunscreen SPF 15+ and wear a long-sleeved shirt and pants when practical. Reduce your exposure to the sun’s most intense UV radiation by seeking shade during midday hours.

VERY HIGH

8-10

Protection against sun damage is needed. If you need to be outside during midday hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., take steps to reduce sun exposure. A shirt, hat and sunscreen are a must, and be sure you seek shade.

Beachgoers should know that white sand and other bright surfaces reflect UV and can double UV exposure.

EXTREME

11+

Protection against sun damage is needed. If you need to be outside during midday hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., take steps to reduce sun exposure. A shirt, hat and sunscreen are a must, and be sure you seek shade.

Beachgoers should know that white sand and other bright surfaces reflect UV and can double UV exposure.

 

CDC recommends easy options for sun protection1

  • Seek shade, especially during midday hours.
  • Wear clothing to protect exposed skin.
  • Wear a hat with a wide brim to shade the face, head, ears, and neck.
  • Wear sunglasses that wrap around and block as close to 100% of both UVA and UVB rays as possible.
  • Use sunscreen with sun protective factor (SPF) 15 or higher, and both UVA and UVB protection.


SUMMERTIME SAFETY FROM A TO Z

SUMMERTIME SAFETY FROM A TO Z

 

Clear skies, softball games, cool water and a family vacation, all images of summer at its best. Summer also presents many safety hazards, making it a good time review.

 

AABC’s of safety, Always Be Careful  with Safety Awareness, safety is in everything we do,24 hours a day, building good safety habits and awareness will help save lives, prevent injuries and yet can be fun!

B – Bees buzzing, wasp, hornets and yellow jackets all around. The best way to help keep bees away, wear light-colored clothing, wear no perfume or scented soaps and cover food while outdoors.

 

 

C– Camping, Enjoy the outdoors and all it offers, but give someone your itinerary. Think carefully about your skill level, supplies and equipment needed for you adventure. Prepare early it will save you in the long haul.

D– Dehydration, Make sure you drink plenty of water, recommended 8 oz every 20 min during rigorous activity. Drink before you start to feel thirsty, by then your body has already started to dehydrate.

E – Epinephrine, if you have serious allergies to insect stings or food allergies, insure you carry medication with you.

F– Food illness, Bacteria grows best in warm and hot temperatures. Everyone loves a picnic; remember to bring your cooler with plenty of ice. Don’t let the food sit in the sun for long periods of time.

G– Grilling, Barbecue meat to an appropriate minimal temperature to kill bacteria, (steak 145, hamburger 160 and pork/poultry 165 degrees)

H– Heat Illness, Prevention, dress in loose, light fitting clothes avoid strenuous activity during the heat of the day and remember to drink plenty of water. Heat Cramps are painful and Heat Stroke can be deadly!

I– Itchy skin, Sun burns and chlorine will dry out your skin. Use plenty of lotion and sunscreen to prevent skin damage. Watch out for the poison oak and poison ivy while hiking too!

J–
Just minutes, it only takes a few minutes to heat the inside of your car in 90+ temperatures to reach lethal temperatures. Please, please do not leave your child or pet inside a vehicle alone for any reason!

K– Keep your distance, lightning is dangerous during thunderstorms if you see it and hear thunder less than 30 seconds later. Seek shelter immediately. Get out of the swimming pools or water if storms are forming.

L– Life Jackets, Smart attire for all boaters, New Mexico and Texas law requires all children under the age of 12 to wear a life jacket while aboard a vessel on the water.

M– Mosquitoes, Pest they are, buzzing and biting. Use insect repellent containing DEET, or oil of eucalyptus. Remember they do carry nasty disease; we don’t want anyone getting West Nile Disease.

N– Noggin, yes that is slang for you head. Protect it, wear a helmet if you are riding your bike, skateboarding, in line skates or even riding your ATV (All Terrain Vehicle) or water skiing. Your brain will thank you!

O– Open water swimming, it is not a good idea to swim alone, avoid canals and fast moving water.

P– Poison Ivy/Oak, Itchy doesn’t cover it. It is best to recognize it and avoid. Remember this rule: “Leaflets of three beware of me”

 

Q– Quiz the kids, ask them who they are going to play with, what they plan on doing and wear they are going. Suggest less risky behaviors and is their play ground safe?

R– Recreational water illness, don’t swallow swimming pool water. Be aware of your kids at the pool. Drowning doesn’t look like it does on TV; they go under and rarely are waving their arms for help.

S– Sunscreen, use SPF of 30 or greater, apply liberally and reapplication every 1-2 hours, more often if involved in water activities.


T– Ticks check everyone after you have been hiking in wooded areas or tall grassy areas. We don’t want Lime Disease

U– UV rays damage your skin, long term effects include skin cancer. Try and cover you head, skin and eyes. Wear only UV A and B approved sun glasses. It reduces potential for cataracts 20-30 years down the road.

V– Vehicle Safety, heading down the highway, looking for adventure! We may all think we are “born to be wild” but let’s make that adventure a safe and enjoyable one. Please wear your seat belts, it is the law.

W– Window guards, Warm weather means open windows and kids always find the knack to locate the open window. Protect them from falls and injury install window guards on upper level windows.

X– Be Extra vigilant, kids are out playing in yards, streets and your neighborhood. Watch out for the kiddos, they are distracted having fun not watching for cars!

Y– Yard work; Wear your PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) you never know when a rock may fly up at your eye. “It is always better to be safe than Blind”

Z–  ZZZZ’s get enough before you travel. Drowsy drivers are just as dangerous as drunk drivers. Drowsy can be Deadly.  Besides you will be able to enjoy your summertime adventures more if you are safe and sound!

 

 

Today’s Post comes to us courtesy of Ken Oswald

Safety and Security Manager for ENMR·Plateau

koswald@plateautel.com