National Safety Week 4 Summer Safety Tips – Things not to leave in a hot vehicle

June 2014 National Safety Month Tips Week 4

SUMMER SAFETY TIPS: Things Not To Leave in a Hot Vehicle

Many of us leave home and head to work inside the comfort of an air conditioned offices, your vehicle is left baking in the blazing sun. But what is left inside your vehicle–could end up costing you in more ways than one.

At three o’clock on a summer afternoon the temperature could be as high as 140 degrees inside your vehicle. Think about the effect that temperature has on anything locked inside the vehicle.

Lighters can explode, make-up can melt and finger nail polish remover can combust and start a fire. Pressurized aerosol or canned sprays can explode. Other products like crayons, chocolate or candy, lipstick or Chap Stick can end up making a mess. All too often expensive electronics too get left behind for convenience sake but can do extreme damage.

Aerosol cans

Aerosols, when kept in overheated conditions, can become volatile and explosive. Many aerosol cans, whatever the contents, warn explicitly against keeping them in areas where the temperature reaches 120 degrees F or more. During the summer, the inside of a car can reach 130 degrees F or hotter. At these temperatures, aerosols become over pressurized and can explode at any time.

Do you keep WD-40, hair spray, Off, Fix-A-Flat, etc. in your vehicle? If so, you might want to reconsider. The picture above is of a pressurized can that exploded in a person’s vehicle and imbedded itself in the back seat of the car. The temperature outside of the closed up vehicle was about 100 degrees F. What if you or a loved one had been sitting in that seat? Do any of your family members keep aerosol cans in their vehicles? If they do, please pass this warning along to them!

Lesson:

  • Do NOT leave pressurized containers (of any kind) in your vehicle where they can be exposed to sunlight!
  • You should always read and follow the manufacturer’s safety recommendations that come with the can.
  • Reporting incidents such as this can help inform personnel of possible risks and dangers both inside and outside the workplace!

The incident pictured in the below pictures happened when a deodorant spray can was left in the back of the vehicle that was parked in an open space in the middle of a hot, sunny day. Without warning, the can exploded inside the car. Fortunately, no one was inside or near the car when it happened.

Certainly aerosol cans left in automobiles (especially cars with tightly-closed windows) on hot days can reach temperatures sufficient to cause them to rupture with considerable force, enough to cause significant damage to a car and potentially injure a person in or near the automobile at the time of the explosion. In that regard, the advice given in the message quoted above is sensible enough.

Medications-Prescription and over the counter medications

Heat can change the chemical composition of a medication and could make it ineffective or worse harmful if taken. If you take any prescription drug, you need to be aware that storage at high temperatures can quickly degrade the potency and stability of many medications.

Most drugs are recommended to be stored at what’s known as “controlled room temperature” — an average of approximately 77 F. Some permit what are known as “controlled excursions” — short periods to accommodate shipping, for example — at temperatures up to 86 F for shorter periods.

Medications tested in higher temperatures with negative outcomes include:

· Valium: When stored at body temperature of 98.6, a decrease of 25 percent of the concentration has been recorded.

· Albuterol Inhalers: Temperatures 120°F and above may burst the inhaler. Also, some studies have shown that higher storage temperatures lead to a decrease in the amount of medication inhaled.

· Concentrated epinephrine: Heat exposure leads to a 64 percent loss in potency.

· Formoterol (capsules that are placed in inhalers): After exposure for four hours to almost 160, the amount released from the heated capsules was not even 50 percent of those capsules stored in appropriate temperatures.

· Lorazepam: When stored at almost 100 degrees, concentration decreased by a very significant 75 percent.

· Nasonex (formoterol inhalers): Temperatures above 120 degrees may cause the container to burst.

Other medications that could be adversely effected by tremendous heats include:

· Any medicine in an aerosolized canister may burst at a heat over 120°F.

· Thyroid Hormones: Excessive heat may alter these hormones that result in a dose inconsistent with the prescribed dose.

· Insulin: Excessive heat can make the vials that store insulin to break. Additionally, the extreme heat may alter insulin, making it not comply with the prescribed dose.

Disposable Lighters

Disposable lighters are small but dangerous items to leave in the car during hot weather. A left lighter on the front seat of a car can get so hot that it exploded and hit the windshield or injure anyone inside, Warning labels on these little fire starters instruct users to never expose them to heat above 120 degrees or prolonged sunlight. As we read earlier, the temperature inside cars during the summer can easily get up to 140 degrees, making the car an unstable environment to store lighters.

Canned drinks. This is less dangerous and more annoying. I left a can of soda in the car while I was at the beach and when I came back the entire top of it had popped open, spraying half of the soda everywhere

Oh, and of course: Kids, pets, and the elderly. You’d be surprised at how many people still don’t know how dangerous it is to leave any living creature inside a car in the summer. Even if the car is parked in the shade!

VEHICLE HEATING DYNAMICS

The atmosphere and the windows of a car are relatively “transparent” to the sun’s shortwave radiation and are warmed little. However this shortwave energy does heat objects that it strikes. For example, a dark dashboard or seat can easily reach temperatures in the range of 180 to over 200 degrees F.

These objects (e.g., dashboard, steering wheel, and child seat) heat the adjacent air by conduction and convection and also give off long wave radiation (red) which is very efficient at warming the air trapped inside a vehicle.

HEAT STUDY CONCLUSIONS:

  • Average elapsed time and temperature rise
  • 10 minutes ~ 19 deg F
  • 20 minutes ~ 29 deg F
  • 30 minutes ~ 34 deg F
  • 60 minutes ~ 43 deg F
  • 1 to 2 hours ~ 45-50 deg F

“Cracking” the windows had little effect Vehicle interior color probably biggest factor “Parents and other caregivers need to be educated that a vehicle is not a babysitter or play area … but it can easily become tragedy” SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS

 

  • NEVER LEAVE A CHILD UNATTENDED IN A VEHICLE. NOT EVEN FOR A MINUTE!
  • IF YOU SEE A CHILD UNATTENDED IN A HOT VEHICLE CALL 9-1-1.
  • Be sure that all occupants leave the vehicle when unloading. Don’t overlook sleeping babies.
  • Always lock your car and ensure children do not have access to keys or remote entry devices. IF A CHILD IS MISSING, ALWAYS CHECK THE POOL FIRST, AND THEN THE CAR, INCLUDING THE TRUNK. Teach your children that vehicles are never to be used as a play area.
  • Keep a stuffed animal in the car seat and when the child is put in the seat place the animal in the front with the driver.
  • Or place your purse or briefcase in the back seat as a reminder that you have your child in the car.
  • Make “look before you leave” a routine whenever you get out of the car.
  • Have a plan that your childcare provider will call you if your child does not show up for school.
  • Don’t leave your pets in the car either!! Same affects can happen to them!

SAFETY FIRST, SAFETY ALWAYS!

Today’s Post comes to us courtesy of Ken Oswald Safety and Security for Plateau

keno@plateautel.com


No Child Left Behind

No, the title of today’s’ post has nothing to do with education. It has to do with children behind left behind in vehicles and dying of heat exposure.

Most of us respond with shock every time we hear of another child forgotten in a vehicle. “How can anyone forget their child like that?” we ask. However much we’d like to believe that only a bad parent would forget a child in a vehicle, the truth of the matter is that both fathers and mothers are equally likely to do it; wealthy and poor makes no difference either; neither does education or mental awareness or intelligence. In fact, if you think “It could never happen to me! I could never do something like that!” you’re more likely to do it because you aren’t going to take the precautions necessary to make sure it never does happen.

As temperatures rise, even a few minutes alone in a car can result in heat stress, dehydration and death for infants and small children. I won’t go over all the numbers about how hot it can get and what it does to a small child; I’ve covered that before on this blog. What I am going to do is to give you a few tips to try to help make sure that you never have to live through the nightmare of realizing you’ve killed your own child because somehow, even though it could never happen to you, it somehow did and you forgot your child in the car.

1. NEVER, EVER, leave your child alone in the car, even for a couple of minutes while you “pop” in somewhere. Don’t trust your memory. You could easily bump into someone you know and start talking, get distracted, fall, or have an accident. Even if you’re only popping into the post office to mail a package, take the child with you, always! Additionally everyone is now being told to call 911 if they see a child left alone in a vehicle. You could end up in a legal battle to keep your child and judges and juries are getting tougher all the time on this issue. It gets tried as “contributing to the delinquency of a minor” or “child neglect”. You could stand a good chance of having the state put your child in a foster home.

2. Put your purse next to the car seat instead of in the front passenger seat. You’ll look for your purse and remember the child in the back seat.

3. Keep a large doll or teddy bear in the car seat when the child isn’t in the seat and move the doll or  teddy bear  to the front passenger seat whenever the child is in the car seat. Seeing the doll or teddy bear in the passenger seat as you get to your destination will remind you the child is there.

4. Hang a tag with your child’s name on it over the rear-view mirror every time you put the child in the car seat. Make sure it’s big enough and visible enough to be hard to ignore or get used to. Only hang it there when the child is in the vehicle.

5. Make arrangements with your daycare worker or care-takers to ALWAYS call you if and when you don’t drop the child off at the usual time.

Most of these tips are simple and easy to implement but they can make the difference between a life filled with happy memories and a life filled with grief and regret.

 


Properly Training Young Summer Help Workers

Within the next couple of months, school will be out for the summer vacation and thousands of young people are going to go job hunting.
Most of these young people have never been exposed to the hazards and dangers of the workplace environment.
You’ve been working in the lumberyard or the warehouse for so long that certain types of behavior are second nature to you; you even forget that you are doing what you are doing for a reason. Not so for the new guy who’s never been in the workplace before.
Simple things like watching for forklifts is something that you do without even thinking about it but the young people who just got hired hasn’t been working around forklifts before and needs to learn to listen and watch for them even as they listen and watch for him or her.

So where do you start? If this type of behavior is now second nature, you probably don’t even know what it is that your new hire needs to know.

Fortunately, OSHA’s young worker’s construction safety topics page is there for you. With thirteen short videos, you can sit your new hires down to view them and know that they’ve been at least been given the basics of safety that’ll hopefully protect them as they do their job.

The following videos are available:

Construction Safety Topics

General Protection

Hearing Protection

Protective Shoes

Head Protection

Eye Protection

Landscaping Safety Topics

Eye Protection

Ear Protection

Foot Protection

Hand Protection

Leg Protection

Lifting

Shoveling

Sun and Hydration


Summertime Safety from A to Z

SUMMERTIME SAFETY FROM A TO Z

Clear skies, softball games, cool water and a family vacation, all images of summer at its best. Summer also presents many safety hazards, making it a good time review.

A ABCs of safety, Always Be Careful with Safety Awareness, safety is in everything we do,24 hours a day, building good safety habits and awareness will help save lives, prevent injuries and yet can be fun!

B Bees buzzing, wasp, hornets and yellow jackets all around. The best way to help keep bees away, wear light-colored clothing, wear no perfume or scented soaps and cover food while outdoors.

C Camping, Enjoy the outdoors and all it offers, but give someone your itinerary. Think carefully about your skill level, supplies and equipment needed for you adventure. Prepare early it will save you in the long haul.

D Dehydration, Make sure you drink plenty of water, recommended 8 oz every 20 min during rigorous activity. Drink before you start to feel thirsty, by then your body has already started to dehydrate.

E Epinephrine, if you have serious allergies to insect stings or food allergies, insure you carry medication with you.

F Food illness, Bacteria grows best in warm and hot temperatures. Everyone loves a picnic; remember to bring your cooler with plenty of ice. Dont let the food sit in the sun for long periods of time.

G Grilling, Barbecue meat to an appropriate minimal temperature to kill bacteria, (steak 145, hamburger 160 and pork/poultry 165 degrees)

H Heat Illness, Prevention, dress in loose, light fitting clothes avoid strenuous activity during the heat of the day and remember to drink plenty of water. Heat Cramps are painful and Heat Stroke can be deadly!

I Itchy skin, Sun burns and chlorine will dry out your skin. Use plenty of lotion and sunscreen to prevent skin damage. Watch out for the poison oak and poison ivy while hiking too!

J Just minutes, it only takes a few minutes to heat the inside of your car in 90+ temperatures to reach lethal temperatures. Please, please do not leave your child or pet inside a vehicle alone for any reason!

K Keep your distance, lightning is dangerous during thunderstorms if you see it and hear thunder less than 30 seconds later. Seek shelter immediately. Get out of the swimming pools or water if storms are forming.

L Life Jackets, Smart attire for all boaters, New Mexico and Texas law requires all children under the age of 12 to wear a life jacket while aboard a vessel on the water.

M Mosquitoes, Pest they are, buzzing and biting. Use insect repellent containing DEET, or oil of eucalyptus. Remember they do carry nasty disease; we dont want anyone getting West Nile Disease.

N Noggin, yes that is slang for you head. Protect it, wear a helmet if you are riding your bike, skateboarding, in line skates or even riding your ATV (All Terrain Vehicle) or water skiing. Your brain will thank you!

O Open water swimming, it is not a good idea to swim alone, avoid canals and fast moving water.

P Poison Ivy/Oak, Itchy doesnt cover it. It is best to recognize it and avoid. Remember this rule: Leaflets of three beware of me

Q Quiz the kids, ask them who they are going to play with, what they plan on doing and wear they are going. Suggest less risky behaviors and is their play ground safe?

R Recreational water illness, dont swallow swimming pool water. Be aware of your kids at the pool. Drowning doesnt look like it does on TV; they go under and rarely are waving their arms for help.

S Sunscreen, use SPF of 30 or greater, apply liberally and reapplication every 1-2 hours, more often if involved in water activities.

T Ticks check everyone after you have been hiking in wooded areas or tall grassy areas. We dont want Lime Disease

U UV rays damage your skin, long term effects include skin cancer. Try and cover you head, skin and eyes. Wear only UV A and B approved sun glasses. It reduces potential for cataracts 20-30 years down the road.

V Vehicle Safety, heading down the highway, looking for adventure! We may all think we are born to be wild but lets make that adventure a safe and enjoyable one. Please wear your seat belts, it is the law.

W Window guards, Warm weather means open windows and kids always find the knack to locate the open window. Protect them from falls and injury install window guards on upper level windows.

X Be Extra vigilant, kids are out playing in yards, streets and your neighborhood. Watch out for the kiddos, they are distracted having fun not watching for cars!

Y Yard work; Wear your PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) you never know when a rock may fly up at your eye. It is always better to be safe than Blind

Z ZZZZs get enough before you travel. Drowsy drivers are just as dangerous as drunk drivers. Drowsy can be Deadly. Besides you will be able to enjoy your summertime adventures more if you are safe and sound!

Today’s post comes to us courtesy of Ken Oswald

Safety and Security Manager for ENMR·Plateau

koswald@plateautel.com


General Water Safety Tips

With the beginning of August now here and forecasted temperatures hitting record highs, what better way to cool off is to take a dip in some cool water. Many of us will take a trip to the lake, beach, rivers or swimming pool to help cool down. Here are just a few helpful summer water safety tips to make your water adventure more enjoyable.

General Water Safety Tips

  • Learn to swim. The best thing anyone can do to stay safe in and around the water is to learn to swim. Always swim with a buddy; never swim alone. The American Red Cross has swimming courses for people of any age and swimming ability. To enroll in a swim course, contact your local Red Cross Chapter or contact me.

  • Swim in areas supervised by a lifeguard.
  • Read and obey all rules and posted signs.
  • Children or inexperienced swimmers should take precautions, such as wearing a U.S. Coast Guard-approved personal floatation device (PFD) when around the water.
  • Watch out for the dangerous “too’s” – too tired, too cold, too far from safety, too much sun, too much strenuous activity.
  • Set water safety rules for the whole family based on swimming abilities (for example, inexperienced swimmers should stay in water less than chest deep).
  • Be knowledgeable of the water environment you are in and its potential hazards, such as deep and shallow areas, currents, depth changes, obstructions and where the entry and exit points are located. The more informed you are, the more aware you will be of hazards and safe practices.
  • Pay attention to local weather conditions and forecasts. Stop swimming at the first indication of bad weather.
  • Use a feet-first entry when entering the water.
  • Enter headfirst only when the area is clearly marked for diving and has no obstructions.
  • Do not mix alcohol with swimming, diving or boating. Alcohol impairs your judgment, balance, and coordination, affects your swimming and diving skills, and reduces your body’s ability to stay warm.
  • Know how to prevent, recognize, and respond to emergencies.

Beach Safety

  • Protect your skin: Sunlight contains two kinds of UV rays — UVA increases the risk of skin cancer, skin aging, and other skin diseases. UVB causes sunburn and can lead to skin cancer. Limit the amount of direct sunlight you receive between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. and wear a sunscreen with a sun protection factor of at least SPF15.
  • Drink plenty of water regularly and often even if you do not feel thirsty. Your body needs water to keep cool.

    • Avoid drinks with alcohol or caffeine in them. They can make you feel good briefly but make the heat’s effects on your body worse. This is especially true with beer, which dehydrates the body.

  • Watch for signs of heat stroke: Heat stroke is life-threatening. The person’s temperature control system, which produces sweating to cool the body, stops working.

    • The body temperature can rise so high that brain damage and death may result if the body is not cooled quickly.
    • Signals of heat stroke include –

      • Hot, red, and usually dry skin, but in some cases such as during athletic activity while wearing a helmet, the skin may be moist
      • Changes in consciousness
      • Rapid, weak pulse, and
      • Rapid, shallow breathing.

    • Call 9-1-1 or your local EMS number.
    • Move the person to a cooler place.
    • Quickly cool the body by wrapping wet sheets around the body and fan it. If you have ice packs or cold packs, place them on each of the victim’s wrists and ankles, in the armpits and on the neck to cool the large blood vessels.
    • Watch for signals of breathing problems and make sure the airway is clear.
    • Keep the person lying down.
  • Wear eye protection

    • Sunglasses are like sunscreen for your eyes and protect against damage that can occur from UV rays.
    • Be sure to wear sunglasses with labels that indicate that they absorb at least 90 percent of UV sunlight.

  • Wear foot protection. Many times, people’s feet can get burned from the sand or cut from glass in the sand. 

  • Boating Safety
  • Alcohol and boating don’t mix. Alcohol impairs your judgment, balance, and coordination — over 50 percent of drownings result from boating incidents involving alcohol. For the same reasons it is dangerous to operate an automobile while under the influence of alcohol, people should not operate a boat while drinking alcohol.
  • Look for the label: Use Coast Guard-approved life jackets for yourself and your passengers when boating and fishing.  Children 12 and under must wear a life jacket, it is New Mexico and Texas state law.

  • Develop a float plan. Anytime you go out in a boat, give a responsible person details about where you will be and how long you will be gone. This is important because if the boat is delayed because of an emergency, becomes lost, or encounters other problems, you want help to be able to reach you.
  • Watch the weather: Know local weather conditions and prepare for electrical storms. Watch local news programs. Stop boating as soon as you see or hear a storm.

Home Pools

  • Never leave a child unobserved around water. Your eyes must be on the child at all times. Adult supervision is recommended.
  • Install a phone by the pool or keep a cordless phone nearby so that you can call 9-1-1 in an emergency.
  • Enclose the pool completely with a self-locking, self-closing fence with vertical bars. Openings in the fence should be no more than four inches wide. The house should not be included as a part of the barrier.

    • The gate should be constructed so that it is self-latching and self-closing.

  • Never leave furniture near the fence that would enable a child to climb over the fence.
  • Always keep basic lifesaving equipment by the pool and know how to use it. Pole, rope, and personal flotation devices (PFDs) are recommended.
  • Keep toys away from the pool when it is not in use. Toys can attract young children into the pool.
  • Pool covers should always be completely removed prior to pool use.
  • If a child is missing, check the pool first. Go to the edge of the pool and scan the entire pool, bottom, and surface, as well as the surrounding pool area

Keeping Children Safe In, On, and Around the Water

  • Maintain constant supervision. Watch children around any water environment (pool, stream, lake, tub, toilet, bucket of water), no matter what skills your child has acquired and no matter how shallow the water. For younger children, practice “Reach Supervision” by staying within an arm’s length reach.
  • Don’t rely on substitutes. The use of flotation devices and inflatable toys cannot replace parental supervision. Such devices could suddenly shift position, lose air, or slip out from underneath, leaving the child in a dangerous situation.

Lakes and Rivers

  • Select a supervised area. Even good swimmers can have an unexpected medical emergency in the water. Never swim alone.
  • Select an area that is clean and well maintained. A clean bathhouse, clean restrooms, and a litter-free environment show the management’s concern for your health and safety.
  • Select an area that has good water quality and safe natural conditions. Murky water, hidden underwater objects, unexpected drop-offs, and aquatic plant life are hazards. Water pollution can cause health problems for swimmers. Strong tides, big waves, and currents can turn an event that began as fun into a tragedy.
  • Make sure the water is deep enough before entering headfirst. Too many swimmers are seriously injured every year by entering headfirst into water that is too shallow. A feet first entry is much safer than diving.
  • Be sure rafts and docks are in good condition. A well-run open-water facility maintains its rafts and docks in good condition, with no loose boards or exposed nails. Never swim under a raft or dock. Always look before jumping off a dock or raft to be sure no one is in the way.
  • Avoid drainage ditches and arroyos. Drainage ditches and arroyos for water run-off are not good places for swimming or playing in the water. After heavy rains, they can quickly change into raging rivers that can easily take a human life. Even the strongest swimmers are no match for the power of the water. Fast water and debris in the current make ditches and arroyos very dangerous.

Ocean Safety


  • Stay within the designated swimming area, ideally within the visibility of a lifeguard.
  • Never swim alone.
  • Beware of RIP currents they can pull you out to sea very quickly.
    If you become caught in a one, swim parallel to the shore until the pull stops and then swim back to shore.


  • Check the surf conditions before you enter the water. Check to see if a warning flag is up or check with a lifeguard for water conditions, beach conditions, or any potential hazards.
  • Stay away from piers, pilings, and diving platforms when in the water.
  • Keep a lookout for aquatic life. Water plants and animals may be dangerous. Avoid patches of plants. Leave animals alone.
  • Make sure you always have enough energy to swim back to shore.
  • Don’t try to swim against a current if caught in one. Swim gradually out of the current, by swimming across it.

Personal Watercraft (Jet Skis)

  • Operate your Personal Watercraft (PWC) with courtesy and common sense. Follow the traffic pattern of the waterway. Obey no-wake and speed zones.
  • Use extreme caution around swimmers and surfers. Run your PWC at a slow speed until the craft is away from shore, swimming areas, and docks. Avoid passing close to other boats and jumping wakes. This behavior is dangerous and often illegal.
  • Coast Guard-approved life jackets should be worn by the operator of the PWC as well as any riders.
  • Ride with a buddy. PWCs should always travel in groups of two or three. You never know when an emergency might occur.
  • Alcohol and operating a PWC doesn’t mix. Alcohol impairs your judgment, balance, and coordination. For the same reasons it is dangerous to operate an automobile, people should not operate a boat or PWC while drinking alcohol.

Surfing, Sail boarding and Windsurfing

  • Always wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
  • Wear a wet suit in cold water to prevent hypothermia.
  • Take windsurfing lessons from a qualified instructor.
  • Never surf alone

Snorkeling, Skin and SCUBA Diving

  • Practice in shallow water.
  • Check the equipment carefully and know how it functions.
  • Learn how to clear water from the snorkel.
  • Learn how to put your mask back on when you tread water.
  • Be careful not to swim or be carried by a current too far from shore or the boat.
  • Receive instructions/take lessons from qualified divers before participating.
  • Get a medical examination and take a swim test before learning SCUBA diving.
  • Once certified, do not dive in rough or dangerous waters or in environments for which you are not trained. Ice, cave, and shipwreck diving require special training. One can easily get lost or trapped and run out of air.
  • Never dive or snorkel by yourself.

Tubing, Canoeing, Kayaking and Rafting

  • Always wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
  • Do not overload the raft.
  • Do not go rafting after a heavy rain.
  • When rafting with a tour company, make sure the guides are qualified. Check with the local chamber of commerce for listings of accredited tour guides and companies.
  • Know local weather conditions. Make sure the water and weather conditions are safe. Because water conducts electricity, it is wise to stop swimming, boating, or any activities on the water as soon as you see or hear a storm. Also, heavy rains can make certain areas dangerous.

Water parks

  • Be sure the area is well supervised by lifeguards before you or others in your group enter the water.
  • Read all posted signs. Follow the rules and directions given by lifeguards. Ask questions if you are not sure about a correct procedure.
  • When you go from one attraction to another, note that the water depth may be different and that the attraction should be used in a different way.
  • Before you start down a water slide, get in the correct position — face up and feet first.
  • Some facilities provide life jackets at no charge. If you cannot swim, wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket. Check others in your group as well.

Water Skiing

  • Wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
  • Be sure the boat and ski equipment are in good shape.
  • Always turn the boat motor completely off when you approach a fallen skier.
  • Watch the water ahead of you at all times.
  • Have an extra person aboard to watch and assist the skier.
  • Run parallel to shore and come in slowly when landing. Sit down if coming in too fast.
  • Use proper hand signals to signal boat operator.

  • Do not ski at night or in restricted areas.
  • Know local weather conditions. Make sure the water and weather conditions are safe .Because water conducts electricity, it is wise to stop swimming, boating or any activities on the water as soon as you see or hear a storm. Also, heavy rains can make certain areas dangerous.

    Information provided by the American Red Cross

Today’s blog post is courtesy of Ken Oswald
Safety and Security Manager
ENMR·Plateau
koswald@plateautel.com



Skin Cancer Awareness and Prevention

Skin Cancer Awareness and Prevention

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types of skin cancer—basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas—are highly curable. However, melanoma, the third most common skin cancer, is more dangerous. About 65%–90% of melanomas are caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light

Protection from sun exposure is important all year round, not just during the summer or at the beach. Ultraviolet (UV) rays can reach you on cloudy and hazy days, as well as bright and sunny days. UV rays also reflect off of surfaces like water, cement, sand, and snow.

The hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. daylight savings time (9 a.m. to 3 p.m. standard time) are the most hazardous for UV exposure in the continental United States. UV rays are the greatest during the late spring and early summer in North America.


Ultraviolet (UV) Light

Ultraviolet (UV) rays are an invisible kind of radiation that comes from the sun, tanning beds, and sunlamps. UV rays can penetrate and change skin cells.

The three types of UV rays are ultraviolet A (UVA), ultraviolet B (UVB), and ultraviolet C (UVC)—

  • UVA is the most common kind of sunlight at the earth’s surface, and reaches beyond the top layer of human skin. Scientists believe that UVA rays can damage connective tissue and increase a person’s risk of skin cancer.
  • Most UVB rays are absorbed by the ozone layer, so they are less common at the earth’s surface than UVA rays. UVB rays don’t reach as far into the skin as UVA rays, but they can still be damaging.
  • UVC rays are very dangerous, but they are absorbed by the ozone layer and do not reach the ground.

Too much exposure to UV rays can change skin texture, cause the skin to age prematurely, and can lead to skin cancer. UV rays also have been linked to eye conditions such as cataracts.

UV Index

The National Weather Service and the Environmental Protection Agency developed the UV Index to forecast the risk of overexposure to UV rays. It lets you know how much caution you should take when working, playing, or exercising outdoors.

The UV Index predicts exposure levels on a 1–15 scale; higher levels indicate a higher risk of overexposure. Calculated on a next-day basis for dozens of cities across the United States, the UV Index takes into account clouds and other local conditions that affect the amount of UV rays reaching the ground.

Exposure
Category

Index Number

Sun Protection Messages

LOW

<2

You can safely enjoy being outside. Wear sunglasses on bright days. If you burn easily, cover up and use sunscreen SPF 15+.

In winter, reflections off snow can nearly double UV strength.

MODERATE

3-5

Take precautions if you will be outside, such as wearing a hat and sunglasses and using sunscreen SPF 15+. Reduce your exposure to the sun’s most intense UV radiation by seeking shade during midday hours.

HIGH

6-7

Protection against sun damage is needed. Wear a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, use sunscreen SPF 15+ and wear a long-sleeved shirt and pants when practical. Reduce your exposure to the sun’s most intense UV radiation by seeking shade during midday hours.

VERY HIGH

8-10

Protection against sun damage is needed. If you need to be outside during midday hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., take steps to reduce sun exposure. A shirt, hat and sunscreen are a must, and be sure you seek shade.

Beachgoers should know that white sand and other bright surfaces reflect UV and can double UV exposure.

EXTREME

11+

Protection against sun damage is needed. If you need to be outside during midday hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., take steps to reduce sun exposure. A shirt, hat and sunscreen are a must, and be sure you seek shade.

Beachgoers should know that white sand and other bright surfaces reflect UV and can double UV exposure.

 

CDC recommends easy options for sun protection1

  • Seek shade, especially during midday hours.
  • Wear clothing to protect exposed skin.
  • Wear a hat with a wide brim to shade the face, head, ears, and neck.
  • Wear sunglasses that wrap around and block as close to 100% of both UVA and UVB rays as possible.
  • Use sunscreen with sun protective factor (SPF) 15 or higher, and both UVA and UVB protection.


SUMMERTIME SAFETY FROM A TO Z

SUMMERTIME SAFETY FROM A TO Z

 

Clear skies, softball games, cool water and a family vacation, all images of summer at its best. Summer also presents many safety hazards, making it a good time review.

 

AABC’s of safety, Always Be Careful  with Safety Awareness, safety is in everything we do,24 hours a day, building good safety habits and awareness will help save lives, prevent injuries and yet can be fun!

B – Bees buzzing, wasp, hornets and yellow jackets all around. The best way to help keep bees away, wear light-colored clothing, wear no perfume or scented soaps and cover food while outdoors.

 

 

C– Camping, Enjoy the outdoors and all it offers, but give someone your itinerary. Think carefully about your skill level, supplies and equipment needed for you adventure. Prepare early it will save you in the long haul.

D– Dehydration, Make sure you drink plenty of water, recommended 8 oz every 20 min during rigorous activity. Drink before you start to feel thirsty, by then your body has already started to dehydrate.

E – Epinephrine, if you have serious allergies to insect stings or food allergies, insure you carry medication with you.

F– Food illness, Bacteria grows best in warm and hot temperatures. Everyone loves a picnic; remember to bring your cooler with plenty of ice. Don’t let the food sit in the sun for long periods of time.

G– Grilling, Barbecue meat to an appropriate minimal temperature to kill bacteria, (steak 145, hamburger 160 and pork/poultry 165 degrees)

H– Heat Illness, Prevention, dress in loose, light fitting clothes avoid strenuous activity during the heat of the day and remember to drink plenty of water. Heat Cramps are painful and Heat Stroke can be deadly!

I– Itchy skin, Sun burns and chlorine will dry out your skin. Use plenty of lotion and sunscreen to prevent skin damage. Watch out for the poison oak and poison ivy while hiking too!

J–
Just minutes, it only takes a few minutes to heat the inside of your car in 90+ temperatures to reach lethal temperatures. Please, please do not leave your child or pet inside a vehicle alone for any reason!

K– Keep your distance, lightning is dangerous during thunderstorms if you see it and hear thunder less than 30 seconds later. Seek shelter immediately. Get out of the swimming pools or water if storms are forming.

L– Life Jackets, Smart attire for all boaters, New Mexico and Texas law requires all children under the age of 12 to wear a life jacket while aboard a vessel on the water.

M– Mosquitoes, Pest they are, buzzing and biting. Use insect repellent containing DEET, or oil of eucalyptus. Remember they do carry nasty disease; we don’t want anyone getting West Nile Disease.

N– Noggin, yes that is slang for you head. Protect it, wear a helmet if you are riding your bike, skateboarding, in line skates or even riding your ATV (All Terrain Vehicle) or water skiing. Your brain will thank you!

O– Open water swimming, it is not a good idea to swim alone, avoid canals and fast moving water.

P– Poison Ivy/Oak, Itchy doesn’t cover it. It is best to recognize it and avoid. Remember this rule: “Leaflets of three beware of me”

 

Q– Quiz the kids, ask them who they are going to play with, what they plan on doing and wear they are going. Suggest less risky behaviors and is their play ground safe?

R– Recreational water illness, don’t swallow swimming pool water. Be aware of your kids at the pool. Drowning doesn’t look like it does on TV; they go under and rarely are waving their arms for help.

S– Sunscreen, use SPF of 30 or greater, apply liberally and reapplication every 1-2 hours, more often if involved in water activities.


T– Ticks check everyone after you have been hiking in wooded areas or tall grassy areas. We don’t want Lime Disease

U– UV rays damage your skin, long term effects include skin cancer. Try and cover you head, skin and eyes. Wear only UV A and B approved sun glasses. It reduces potential for cataracts 20-30 years down the road.

V– Vehicle Safety, heading down the highway, looking for adventure! We may all think we are “born to be wild” but let’s make that adventure a safe and enjoyable one. Please wear your seat belts, it is the law.

W– Window guards, Warm weather means open windows and kids always find the knack to locate the open window. Protect them from falls and injury install window guards on upper level windows.

X– Be Extra vigilant, kids are out playing in yards, streets and your neighborhood. Watch out for the kiddos, they are distracted having fun not watching for cars!

Y– Yard work; Wear your PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) you never know when a rock may fly up at your eye. “It is always better to be safe than Blind”

Z–  ZZZZ’s get enough before you travel. Drowsy drivers are just as dangerous as drunk drivers. Drowsy can be Deadly.  Besides you will be able to enjoy your summertime adventures more if you are safe and sound!

 

 

Today’s Post comes to us courtesy of Ken Oswald

Safety and Security Manager for ENMR·Plateau

koswald@plateautel.com