OSHA’s New Small Entity Compliance Guide for Silica Standard

If you work in construction and/or deal with concrete you know that there is a new standard for Respirable CrystallineSilica.

What might not be as obvious is how you need to go about being compliant with this new standard. OSHA understands that small businesses, indeed all businesses, don’t have the knowledge, money or expertise to navigate this new standard. As such, they’ve put together a 103 page guide to help. The OSHA Small Entity Compliance Guide for the Respirable Crystalline Silica Standard for Construction is available as a free download.

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Understanding the new cut resistant standard

ANSI/ISEA 105-2016

The new ANSI/ISEA 105-2016 standard for cut resistance now has 9 levels of cut resistance
instead of 5. The reason for this new standard has to do with the gamut covered by cut level
4 and cut level 5 in the old standard. Cut level 4 spanned from 1500g of cut resistance to
3499g of cut resistance while cut level 5 spanned from 3500g to over 7000g. This meant that,
although two gloves might both be rated as a cut level 5 glove, one could, in fact, have twice
the cut resistance of the other (where the one glove is rated at 3500g and the other one at
7000g). The new standard eliminates the cut level 4 and 5 of the old standard and replaces
them with 6 narrower, more defined ones as seen in the graph on the following page.
The new standard is differentiated from the old standard by the letter A in front of the cut
level. The new standard therefore lists the cut level as ANSI A1, ANSI A2, ANSI A3, etc…

Be aware, however, that because the new standard is not mandatory, you might not see
certain manufacturer making the switch, especially if it means footing the cost of retesting
each glove. It is therefore up to you as the end user to make sure you pay attention to the
rating itself, printed on the glove to see if it is a plain ANSI 1, ANSI2, etc… or the new ANSI
A1, ANSI A2, etc…

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Download the white-paper of this blog post

 


Understanding the Standard for High-Visibility Clothing

High-visibility (abbreviated as hi-vis) clothing was designed to make you easier to spot when you are at a work site, out for a walk where vehicles are present or any other time you want to make sure that you are seen. All hi-vis clothing, however, is not created equal. There are different classes, different levels and different types.

The purpose of this paper is to help you navigate these differences to make sure that you have the best protection as well as being compliant.

The ANSI/ISEA 107-2015 standard was designed by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) along with the International Safety Equipment Association (ISEA) in order to determine which hi-vis vest, jacket, raingear, etc… needs to be worn in which situation in order to make sure that employees are visible enough to maintain a safe working environment.

Hi-vis garments are available in raingear, sweatshirts, T-shirts, pants, vests, fall protection vests, hats and incident command vests

Colors

There are only three colors that meet the standard. These colors are fluorescent yellow-green,

fluorescent orange-red and fluorescent red. Any other color does not meet the standard. Be aware of this as there are many different color vests available. Only these three colors meet the standard.

Class 1, 2, 3 and E

There are three classes of hi-vis clothing, each for a specific job application

Class 1 – Designed for areas that are removed from traffic or where the traffic that is present never exceeds 25 MPH.

A Class 1 vest or jacket must have a minimum of 6.46 linear feet of 2″ reflective tape or 9.39 linear feet of 1 3.8″ reflective tape and at least 217 in2 of high-visibility background material.

Class 2 – Designed for areas where the traffic does not exceed 50 MPH. As a general rule this includes most roadways but excludes highways.

A Class 2 garment must have a minimum of 8.375 linear feet of 2″ reflective tape or 12.2 linear feet of 1 3.8″ reflective tape and at least 775 in2 of high-visibility background material

Class 3 – Designed for highways and roadways where speeds will exceed 50 MPH.

A Class 3 garment must have a minimum of 12.92 linear feet of 2″ reflective tape and at least 1240 in2 of high-visibility background material.

Class E – Designed for pants. A Class E pair of pants adds additional background material and reflective tape so that, when combined with a class 2 vest, coat or jacket, we end up with a Class 3 assemble.

Level 1 and 2

In addition to having a “class” rating, you will often see a hi-vis garment with a “level” rating. The level rating actually applies to the reflective tape on the garment. Level 1 retro reflective tape must exceed 65cd/(lx • m2) at observation angle 12° and entrance angle 5° cd/(lx/m2) and a level 2 must exceed 330cd/(lx • m2) at observation angle 12° and entrance angle 5°.

Type “O’, “P” and “R”

Finally, there is also a “type” classification for hi-vis garment designed to reflect the environment in which they are used.

Type O – The “O” stands for “Off-road”.

Type R – The “R” stands for “Roadway”

Type P – The “P” stands for “Public Safety”

Additional considerations

Many hi-vis garments are now also available in a flame resistant material for work in environments where flammability is an issue. Look for the “FR” on the label.

Counterfeits and Fakes

There are plenty of hi-vis garments out there that are made with inferior materials that do not meet the standard. These garments may or may not have fake labels in them that say that they are ANSI approved when, in fact, they are not. Only purchase garment made by trusted manufacturers like M. L. Kishigo, PIP, Radians, Tingley, Majestic, Ergodyne, Blaklader and Occunomix.

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Download the “Understanding the Standard for High-Visibility Clothing” whitepaper


OSHA Announces Final Rule for Silica Dust

Dust

Almost two and a half million people are exposed to silica dust during the course of their daily work. Silica dust is found in concrete and stone. Any job that creates concrete or stone dust (drilling, sawing, crushing, etc…) releases that dust which can than be inhale. Most often engineering can control that dust, mostly through the use of water. Silica dust, however, is so harmful that controlling the dust simply isn’t enough. OSHA recently made some changes to the silica dust standard.

The new standard:

  • Reduces the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for crystalline silica to 50 micrograms per cubic meter of air, averaged over an eight-hour shift.
  • Requires employers to control silica dust through engineering controls (water to keep the dust from getting in the air and using ventilation to remove what little dust remain).
  • Requires employers to provide respiratory protection when the PEL is going to be over 50 micrograms and well as to keep employees from areas where the exposure might be higher than the PEL
  • It also requires employers to provide proper training and medical testing for employees who might have had high exposures.

It also allows a new timeline for employers to comply with this new standard, especially the fracking industry which faces a daunting task in order to comply.




From M. L. Kishigo…

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The new ANSI/ISEA 107-2015 Standard was just released at the beginning of February. The new Standard provides the most significant changes since the standard was developed in 1999.

Below are some highlights of the new ANSI 107-2015 compared to the ANSI 107-2010.

See below or download our .PDF for a breakdown of the
“NEW ANSI/ISEA 107-2015 STANDARD – Quick Facts You Need To Know”

1. Updated Garment Types & Classes:

EXISTING: There are still three garment Performance Classes based on amounts of background materials and reflective materials (Class 1, 2, 3 and Supplemental Class E).

NEW:  3 new types of garments have been outlined within each of the 3 Performance Classes that provide further guidance for work activities being performed.

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Kishigo2

2. Supplementary Class E & Updated Class 3 Ensemble:

NEW: Leg Gaiters are NOW considered Class E Compliant as long as the background and retroreflective material meet the minimum ANSI requirements.

NEW:  A Class E item (such as a pair of compliant Leg Gaiters) can now be worn with a Performance Class 2 or Class 3 upper body garment making the overall classification for the ensemble Performance Class 3.

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3. Sizing Revision For Smaller Workers:NEW: ANSI 107-2015 has made apparel accommodations to adapt to smaller sized wearers.

NEW: The new 2015 Standard reduces the background material requirements for the smallest size offered. Type R (“roadway”) Class 2 and Class 3, are now offered in a “true to size – Size S”. The new sizing accommodation brings comfort, and more importantly added safety for smaller workers.

4. Updated Label Pictogram Requirement:EXISTING: All ANSI garments have been required to have a Pictogram label.

NEW: The New 2015 Standard requires all ANSI garment labels to clearly designate 3 factors:

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X: Type of Garment. (O, R, or P)

Y: Class of Garment. (1, 2, 3 or E)

Z: FR or Non-FR Designation

NEW: If the garment is FR Compliant, the specific standard must be appropriately noted on the label.

NEW: If the garment is Non-FR, the pictogram must clearly be labeled “NON-FR” and the following statement must be present:

“This garment is not Flame Resistant as defined by ANSI/ISEA 107-2015 Section 10.5.”

For a more in-depth overview on the updates included within ANSI/ISEA 107-2015
please see below to download a .PDF copy of our Technical Document:

“ISEA Board Releases New Standard: ANSI/ISEA 107-2015 Tech Doc”