New Arc Flash Warning Symbol

arc-flash-warning-ISO-900

Have you seen this symbol before? Probably not and for good reason. It’s new and it’s important. This is the new symbol adopted by the International Organization for Standardization’s (ISO)  to denote a potential danger from arc flash.

It will doubtlessly take a while to roll out and start showing up on electrical boxes and generators but if and when you do see it either stay clear or, if you do need to work on the panel, make sure you are wearing the appropriate PPE designed for that level of potential arc flash.



NECA PPE Selector App

From the necanet.org press release

Based on 2015 NFPA 70E to Help Field and Office Personnel Stay Safe

NECA_PPE_App_2015_iconThe National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) announces the release of its 2015 Personal Protect Equipment (PPE) Selector App, based on the 2015 edition of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70E Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace and designed after NECA’s popular print publication, NECA’s NFPA 70E PPE Selector.

The app is available for $9.99 in iTunes and Google Play stores for both mobile and tablet devices.

“NECA is very excited about this version of the PPE Selector app and the information provided to personnel. By providing the rubber glove charts in addition to the clothing and equipment provided in PPE categories, an electrician can easily determine what he or she needs to wear while working around energized equipment,” Wes Wheeler, NECA Director of Safety.

PPE_deviceThis popular guide was developed by NECA to assist the industry in understanding and applying the personal protective requirements of NFPA 70E and it has become one of NECA’s best-selling publications due to its practicality and design which facilitates employees make sure all safety work practices are applied. The content is based on the information contained in the standard. This guide is not designated as a replacement for the NFPA standard but only to serve as a quick reference for contractors working in the field.

NECA is very excited about this version of the PPE Selector app and the information provided to personnel. By providing the rubber glove charts in addition to the clothing and equipment provided in PPE categories, an electrician can easily determine what he or she needs to wear while working around energized equipment,” Wes Wheeler, NECA Director Safety.

This easy-to-use and informative app is meant to help electricians and supervisors determine the appropriate personal protective equipment to wear when there is a need to work around energized circuits.

By providing the Risk Assessment guidelines found in NFPA 70E Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace for shock and arc flash hazards, personnel can now choose the right PPE for the tasks they will be performing.

Priced at $9.99, the new 2015 NECA Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Selector app is available for sale through the iTunes and Google Play stores for both mobile and tablet devices, visit necanet.org/PPEapp for more information and/or to download the app


OSHA 1910.269 Compliance Date Approaching

Enforcement on the OSHA 1910.269  regulations on flame resistant clothing, arc flash hazard analysis and arc rated protective clothing was originally supposed to be set for the first of this year. The date was originally pushed back and the new date is right around the corner.

OSHA officials have said that they won’t be issuing citations before April 1st 2015 but with April less than 3 weeks away it’s important for employers to think about making sure that they have done the hazard analysis and are providing the right clothing and PPE for their employees.

The bottom line is that OSHA 1910.269 says that employers need to know what arc flash and potential flame hazards workers might be exposed to in the course of their job and make sure that their employees have the adequate protection.

For more information on OSHA 1910.269 click here.

To shop for Arc Flash and flame resistant clothing click here.


PPE Selection Matrix for Occupational Exposure to Ebola Virus

OSHA has just put out a new “FactSheet” for PPE Selection Matrix for Occupational Exposure to Ebola Virus. Most useful is the chart on page 2 that clearly outlines what type and what level of PPE should be used based on the type of work and level of contact with an infected person.

Ebola_Chart

Put together primarily for “workers whose jobs involvehealthcare, mortuary/death care, airline and other transportation operations,cleaning and environmental services, law enforcement,” the document is available to anyone who feels he or she might come in contact with the virus.

Click here to download the document.


Safety Consideration for Welders

Having recently redesigned our e-commerce website, we tried to make sure that our menu got you where you needed to be. Easier said then done!

A perfect example presented itself in the issue of welding. Now our site has a “welding” section but welding also could appear under “Respiratory Protection“, it could appear under “Gloves“, it could appear under “Eye Protection”, etc…

FlexView-Down

This got me thinking about what exactly as the health and safety issues that welders need to be aware of. I came up with the following list, if there are others that I’m missing please add them in the comments below:

  1. Respiratory Protection – As already mentioned welding entails fumes and particulates that shouldn’t end up in our lungs.  Make sure you understand what harmful fumes, vapors or particulates you need to protect against in order to have the proper filters or respiratory setup.
  2. Heat – Welding can generate temperatures that reach 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Make sure you have the proper welding gloves and apparel. You also need to be aware of slag and hot debris that can fly off and end up burning  (any welder who’s had hot slag down their back understands what I’m talking about). Heat can also start fires so make sure that the area around where you’re welding is clear of trash or debris that might ignite.
  3. Eye Protection – Most types of welding require special eye protection. Make sure you understand what shade of lens you need before you start welding. Burned retinas can be the price if you make a mistake.
  4. Hearing Protection – Aside from the noise involved with the welding itself, many welders work in high noise environments. It might not be the most comfortable thing in the world to have to wear hearing protection under that welding helmet but it’s a whole lot better than tinnitus or hearing loss later.
  5. Electrical Issues – Most forms of welding operate on the principle of creating an electrical short that melts metal to form a bond. Make sure you understand the process and understand grounding and what to avoid touching.
  6. Ergonomic Issues –  A lot of welding work is done in tight places or in positions that can wear on the welder.  Knee pads, back supports as well as other ergonomic equipment might be needed.

What am I missing?


OROSHA Pesticide and PPE Guide

Spring is here! It’s time to get out and plant those flowers and vegetables!

It’s also time to spray pesticides if you aren’t going organic which means that you need to think about how to protect yourself.

Fortunately, Oregon OSHA has put together a fairly comprehensive document to help you select the right Personal Protective Equipment, including apparel, respiratory protection, gloves, etc…

Pesticide
Click on the image above in order to download the 4 page document from the OROSHA website.