What is it you need to know to stay safe in your job?

OSHA, NIOSH, ANSI and a number of other agencies to a great job of tracking potential hazards for most major industries. If you work in construction for example, there’s no end of material out on the internet to help you identify and protect against the hazards and dangers that might be present; same if you work in manufacturing. But what about those other jobs, the ones that we don’t necessarily think of as “dangerous”? Where, for example, for you go to find information of the potential hazards of being an artist? Or what about those of a dog trainer, or a printer?

Fortunately there’s a site that has the information you need.

Haz-Map

Head over to http://hazmap.nlm.nih.gov/hazmap-list?main_category=High+Risk+Jobs&table=tbljobs&alpha=A and dig around alphabetically to find a whole lot of information on topics you might not have thought about.

 

 



LNI Caution Zone Jobs

During last week’s governor’s safety show in Tacoma, I was able to gather some documents the contents of which I’m going to be passing along to you over the next few days. One of the most informative booths was the LNI booth with a lot of really great information. Among them was the Pocket Guide to Caution Zone Jobs.
A caution zone job is a “work activity performed regularly by workers that involves any of 14 risk factors. These 14 risk factors fall into 6 distinct categories as follows:

I. Awkward postures of the shoulders, arms, neck, back or knees
1. Awkward postures of the shoulders and arms – Working with the hand(s) above the head, or elbow(s) above the shoulder, for more than 2 hours total each day
2. Awkward postures of the neck or back – Working with the neck or back bent more than 30 degrees (without support and without the ability to vary posture), more than 2 hours total per day.
3. Squatting – Squatting more than 2 hours per day.
4. Kneeling – Kneeling more than 2 hours total per day.

II. High hand force

5. Pinching – Pinching an unsupported object or objects weighing 2 or more pounds per hand, or pinching with a force of 4 or more pounds per hand, more than 2 hours total per day.
6. Gripping – Gripping an unsupported object or objects weighting 10 or more pounds per hand, or gripping with a force of 10 or more pounds per hand, more than 2 hours total per day.

III. Highly repetitive motion of the neck, shoulders, elbows, wrists or hands

7. Highly repetitive motion – repeating the same motion with the neck, shoulders, elbows, wrists or hands (excluding keying activities) with little or no variation every few seconds, for more than 2 hours per day.
8. Keying – Performing intensive keying more than 4 hours total per day.

IV. Repeated impacts with the hands or knees
9. Repeated impact – Using the hand (heel/base of palm) or knew as a hammer more than 10 times per hour, more than 2 hours total per day.

V. Lifting objects

10. Heavy lifting – Lifting objects weighing more than 75 pounds once per day or more than 55 pounds more than 10 times per day.
11. Frequent lifting – Lifting objects weighing more than 10 pounds, if done more than twice per minute, more than 2 hours per day.
12. Awkward lifting – Lifting objects weighing more than 25 pounds above the shoulders, below the knees or at arms length, more than 25 times per day.

VI. Using tools that have high or moderate vibration

13. High Hand-Arm Vibration – Using impact wrenches, carpet strippers, chain saws, percussive tools (jack hammers, scalers, riveting or chipping hammers) or other hand tools that typically have high vibration levels more than 30 minutes total per day
14. Moderate Hand-Arm Vibration – Using grinders, sanders, jigsaws or other hand tools that typically have moderate vibration levels more than 2 hours per day.

Check out the Department of Labor and Industries website at www.LNI.wa.gov/wisha/ergo for more information, tools, downloads, etc….
Even better, how about a no-fee consultation? Send an email to ergonomics@LNI.wa.gov if you live in the state of Washington. If you live outside of the state of WA check your state LNI office.