Process Safety Incident Anniversary Calendar

You’ve probably heard the adage that “He who doesn’t learn from history is bound to repeat it”. That is essentially the thinking behind this downloadable calendar by safeopedia.com. Here’s how they explain it:

“This calendar contains a collection of CSB investigations, Marsh report top 100 losses and numerous other sources of high impact process safety incidents of the past. On the anniversary of these events a calendar reminder will provide an alert containing high level details of the incidents and resources where available. Remember the events at the water cooler, draft safety moments and share learnings across your organization with these daily reminders.”

Calendar

To download the calendar go to their calendar webpage and fill out a short form.

Please visit our e-commerce website at www.nationalsafetyinc.com

 


Fainting at the sight of blood constitutes a recordable case

Drop_of_Blood

According to OSHA, if one of your employees faints at the sight of blood, it’s a recordable incident. Here’s what they say on their website about the issue:

Scenario: An employee scratched his index finger on a vinyl saw clamp at work. He immediately began walking to the onsite first aid station to obtain a Band-Aid. On the way, the injured employee met a co-worker who told him that he had a Band-Aid in his pocket. As the co-worker began to apply the Band-Aid, the injured employee looked at his finger where there was a small amount of blood on the skin adjacent to the nail bed. The worker immediately became light headed and fainted. The injured worker did not incur any additional injury or treatment. When he regained consciousness, the employee indicated that he fainted because he cannot tolerate seeing blood.

Question: Is this a recordable case on the OSHA Log of Work-related Injuries and Illnesses?

Response: Section 1904.5(a) states, “[the employer] must consider an injury or illness to be work-related if an event or exposure in the work environment either caused or contributed to the resulting condition. Work-relatedness is presumed for injuries and illnesses resulting from events or exposures occurring in the work environment, unless an exception in Section 1904.5(b)(2) specifically applies.” Under this language, a case is presumed work-related if an event or exposure in the work environment is a discernible cause of the injury or illness or of a significant aggravation to a pre-existing condition. The work event or exposure need only be one of the discernable causes; it need not be the sole or predominant cause.

In order to be a recordable event, a loss of consciousness must be the result of a work-related event or exposure. Loss of consciousness is no different, in this respect, from any other injury or illness. The exception to the presumption of work-relatedness in section 1904.5(b)(2)(ii) allows an employer to exclude cases that involve signs or symptoms that surface at work but result solely from a non-work-related event or exposure that occurs outside the work environment. This exception allows employers to exclude cases where a loss of consciousness is due solely to a personal health condition, such as epilepsy, diabetes, or narcolepsy. See, the January 19, 2001, preamble to the final rule revising OSHA’s recordkeeping regulation at 66 FR 5994.

Read all the details on the OSHA response page.


Cost of Incident Calculator

Have you ever wondered exactly how much the incidents in your company are actually costing you? Maybe you have a hard time convincing management that the cost of the measure you’re trying to put into place is justified because of the amount of money it will save but you need exact numbers.

The folks at Safe-Staff (http://www.safe-staff.com) have put together an online cost calculator to answer that question for you. Enter the number of incidents you have a week, the amount of timeyou spend recording, tracking and reporting each incident and the hourly rate the person managing the incident is paid and the calculator will give you a number.

Here’s a hint… the number is going to be a lot higher than you originally thought; in fact, with only one incident a week, your annual cost is almost 2 million dollars.

 


Download your free Incident Cost Calculator

Download your Free Incident Cost Calculator!

From the incident control room website…

Having spent a long time trying to quantify the costs of Incidents at various customer sites, we know the pain of quantifying costs of incidents. Well no more, download our free Incident Costs Calculator today and:

  • Use our template to quantify a comprehensive Incident Costs!
  • Automatically calculate the costs across 5 headers including, Incident Costs, Investigation, Damage, Replacement, Productivity & External Costs!
  • Edit to your organisations specific needs!

Register at http://info.incidentcontrolroom.com/download-your-free-incident-costs-calculator to download the free Incident Cost Calculator.