Flight Delayed? Learn CPR!

Next time you’re at the airport in Cleveland, Cincinnati or Orlando and your flight is delayed, rather than fuming and ranting about what you can’t change, take a few minutes, find an American Heart Association “Hands-Only CPR training kiosk” and learn CPR!

The hands-on training only takes about 5 minutes and it’s being piloted (no pun intended) in select airports across the United States. It includes a short video explaining how hands-only CPR works and how to do it (Hands-only CPR essentially eliminates the mouth-to-mouth in favor of chest compression only), a practice session on a practice rubber torso which lets you know if you are doing it correctly (hand placement and depth of compression are the 2 main reasons people do it incorrectly) and a 30 second test.

The newest kiosks include a video telling the story of how Matt Lickenbrock saved the life of Sean Ferguson after learning hands-only CPR a few days earlier during a 3-hour layover at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (It took Matt three tries to get the chest compression right because he hadn’t been pressing hard enough).

The American Heart Association hopes to eventually install kiosks in many more airports and public places.

You can read more about the Matt Lickenbrock story on the American Heart Association website.

 



Protect Your Workers from Poisonous Plants

I’ve only had poison Ivy once in my life but I remember it well because it was so unpleasant. The rash would be at it’s worse in the middle of the night and I ended up in the bathtub several nights in a row with Aveeno Oatmeal Bath treatment. I wouldn’t wish that on my worst enemy and I’m sure you wouldn’t wish that on yourself or anyone of your workers.

With increased work done outdoors as the weather gets warm, it’s important to know how to protect yours workers.

First of all, they need to know how to identify poison ivy, poison sumac and poison oak. Stay away if you can.

If you must work around these plants make sure you wear long sleeve shirts, pants and gloves.

Wash these items of clothing (including your shoes) at the end of your shift. Minimize contact with anything else as the oil urushiol that makes it poisonous can rub off and contaminate further. Wash these items separately from other laundry to avoid cross-contamination.

Use IvyX Pre-Contact Towelettes to further protect the arms, hands and face.

Wash all tools that came in contact with the poisonous plants with soap and water or with rubbing alcohol. Urushiol can stay active for as long as five years.

Do not burn the plants. Fire doesn’t neutralize the urushiol, it merely makes it airborne. If urushiol should get into the lungs it can turn into a serious reaction that may require medical attention.

If you believe you have been exposed, thoroughly wash the area with soap and water. If a rash develops use an antihistamine and/or calamine lotion. If it gets too serious, consult a doctor.


New Arc Flash Warning Symbol

arc-flash-warning-ISO-900

Have you seen this symbol before? Probably not and for good reason. It’s new and it’s important. This is the new symbol adopted by the International Organization for Standardization’s (ISO)  to denote a potential danger from arc flash.

It will doubtlessly take a while to roll out and start showing up on electrical boxes and generators but if and when you do see it either stay clear or, if you do need to work on the panel, make sure you are wearing the appropriate PPE designed for that level of potential arc flash.




ASSE to Become the ASSP

The ASSE (American Society of Safety Engineers) is one of the oldest safety associations in America but it’s about to get a rebirth. The ASSE house of delegates recently voted in favor of changing their name to the ASSP (American Society of Safety Professionals).

The reason for this change is simply that, when the association was founded in 1911 all members were engineers. Today, however, the association members make up a wide variety of professions and disciplines. Engineers only make up 3% of the association.

The vote now goes to ASSE members who have 45 days to get their vote in meaning that we’ll have the final tally sometime in mid August.

It is unclear  whether the green and gold logo will remain the same with the “E” simply changing to a “P” as is reported in some instances or changed as seems to be advocated on the new microsite http://www.assp.org


assp-logo


New “Shipyard Employment” OSHA Fact Sheet

I only live about 10 minutes from one of the biggest shipyards in the USA. Probably about half of my friends and acquaintances work at that shipyard. I have two son-in-laws and both of them work at the shipyard so needless to say safety at the shipyard is important to me.

Shipyard

It’s apparently important to OSHA as well. They have just released a new Fact Sheet on “Shipyard Employment” outlining the unique dangers and hazards inherent in shipyards as well as outlining a plan to help keep workers safe.

You can download it here.