Understanding the new cut resistant standard

ANSI/ISEA 105-2016

The new ANSI/ISEA 105-2016 standard for cut resistance now has 9 levels of cut resistance
instead of 5. The reason for this new standard has to do with the gamut covered by cut level
4 and cut level 5 in the old standard. Cut level 4 spanned from 1500g of cut resistance to
3499g of cut resistance while cut level 5 spanned from 3500g to over 7000g. This meant that,
although two gloves might both be rated as a cut level 5 glove, one could, in fact, have twice
the cut resistance of the other (where the one glove is rated at 3500g and the other one at
7000g). The new standard eliminates the cut level 4 and 5 of the old standard and replaces
them with 6 narrower, more defined ones as seen in the graph on the following page.
The new standard is differentiated from the old standard by the letter A in front of the cut
level. The new standard therefore lists the cut level as ANSI A1, ANSI A2, ANSI A3, etc…

Be aware, however, that because the new standard is not mandatory, you might not see
certain manufacturer making the switch, especially if it means footing the cost of retesting
each glove. It is therefore up to you as the end user to make sure you pay attention to the
rating itself, printed on the glove to see if it is a plain ANSI 1, ANSI2, etc… or the new ANSI
A1, ANSI A2, etc…

new_cut_standard

Download the white-paper of this blog post

 


Understanding the Standard for High-Visibility Clothing

High-visibility (abbreviated as hi-vis) clothing was designed to make you easier to spot when you are at a work site, out for a walk where vehicles are present or any other time you want to make sure that you are seen. All hi-vis clothing, however, is not created equal. There are different classes, different levels and different types.

The purpose of this paper is to help you navigate these differences to make sure that you have the best protection as well as being compliant.

The ANSI/ISEA 107-2015 standard was designed by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) along with the International Safety Equipment Association (ISEA) in order to determine which hi-vis vest, jacket, raingear, etc… needs to be worn in which situation in order to make sure that employees are visible enough to maintain a safe working environment.

Hi-vis garments are available in raingear, sweatshirts, T-shirts, pants, vests, fall protection vests, hats and incident command vests

Colors

There are only three colors that meet the standard. These colors are fluorescent yellow-green,

fluorescent orange-red and fluorescent red. Any other color does not meet the standard. Be aware of this as there are many different color vests available. Only these three colors meet the standard.

Class 1, 2, 3 and E

There are three classes of hi-vis clothing, each for a specific job application

Class 1 – Designed for areas that are removed from traffic or where the traffic that is present never exceeds 25 MPH.

A Class 1 vest or jacket must have a minimum of 6.46 linear feet of 2″ reflective tape or 9.39 linear feet of 1 3.8″ reflective tape and at least 217 in2 of high-visibility background material.

Class 2 – Designed for areas where the traffic does not exceed 50 MPH. As a general rule this includes most roadways but excludes highways.

A Class 2 garment must have a minimum of 8.375 linear feet of 2″ reflective tape or 12.2 linear feet of 1 3.8″ reflective tape and at least 775 in2 of high-visibility background material

Class 3 – Designed for highways and roadways where speeds will exceed 50 MPH.

A Class 3 garment must have a minimum of 12.92 linear feet of 2″ reflective tape and at least 1240 in2 of high-visibility background material.

Class E – Designed for pants. A Class E pair of pants adds additional background material and reflective tape so that, when combined with a class 2 vest, coat or jacket, we end up with a Class 3 assemble.

Level 1 and 2

In addition to having a “class” rating, you will often see a hi-vis garment with a “level” rating. The level rating actually applies to the reflective tape on the garment. Level 1 retro reflective tape must exceed 65cd/(lx • m2) at observation angle 12° and entrance angle 5° cd/(lx/m2) and a level 2 must exceed 330cd/(lx • m2) at observation angle 12° and entrance angle 5°.

Type “O’, “P” and “R”

Finally, there is also a “type” classification for hi-vis garment designed to reflect the environment in which they are used.

Type O – The “O” stands for “Off-road”.

Type R – The “R” stands for “Roadway”

Type P – The “P” stands for “Public Safety”

Additional considerations

Many hi-vis garments are now also available in a flame resistant material for work in environments where flammability is an issue. Look for the “FR” on the label.

Counterfeits and Fakes

There are plenty of hi-vis garments out there that are made with inferior materials that do not meet the standard. These garments may or may not have fake labels in them that say that they are ANSI approved when, in fact, they are not. Only purchase garment made by trusted manufacturers like M. L. Kishigo, PIP, Radians, Tingley, Majestic, Ergodyne, Blaklader and Occunomix.

hi-vis_standard_photo

Download the “Understanding the Standard for High-Visibility Clothing” whitepaper


What’s Your Fall or Confined Space Rescue Plan?

You have a fall protection program. You have a confined space procedure, That’s all great and good but even the best laid plans of mice and men, as they say… So what’s your rescue plan? What’s going to happen when, despite all the training and preparations, something goes wrong?

All too often, as we call on customers we hear them answer that question with “We’ll call 911!”

Maybe it’s time to reexamine that rescue plan for a number of reasons:

  1. Are 911 emergency personnel going to be able to able to make it there in time? In a great many cases, unless you’re right next door the fire department response times are going to be high; to high to save the life or lives.
  2. Are 911 personnel trained in the kind of rescue that is necessary? Confined Space rescue and rescues after a fall aren’t normally among the training that 911 emergency personnel get. They might not be able to do a proper rescue.
  3. Do emergency personnel have the right equipment? Rescues from falls and confined space require specialized equipment. Don’t assume that your fire department or 911 emergency response team has this gear, especially in smaller towns where there isn’t a lot of funds.

OSHA requires you to have an emergency rescue procedure and plan in place. If you haven’t checked with your local 911 team to see if they can meet the above criteria, you’ll be held responsible, not them.

Start with proper training like the training available through convergence training but don’t stop there. Run through the scenario and have emergency drills. Mainly, make sure that you are equipped and prepared because once you’re in the middle of an emergency it’s too late to find out that your local 911 response team can’t handle the job.







Infants Dying in Car Seats

Are you leaving your infant in their car seat because they are asleep and you’ve arrived at your location? If they are still properly strapped in, that’s okay but if you’re in the habit of unbuckling them they are in danger of death by positional asphyxiation.

car-seat

Positional asphyxiation occurs in infants who don’t have the neck strength to lift their head. If they aren’t properly trapped in they can slump forward and their head can fall on their chest and, because they don’t have strength in their neck muscles they can’t lift their head enough to open up their airways in order to breathe.

Read about one such death and the efforts of Shepard Dodd’s parents to spread the word in order to save the lives of other infants. Better yet, spread the word. In simply talking about this post here at work several women admitted that they have let their infant who wasn’t strapped in sleep in a car seat in the past. My guess is that most parents have no idea.