CSB to OSHA “UNACCEPTABLE”

We’ve been following Rafael Moure-Eraso’s battle with OSHA for a while now in this blog (See “CSB Chides OSHA on Combustible Dust Standard“, for an example) and it seems that Raphael has stepped it up even more.

According to a memo published late last week, Raphael states the CSB has a  “statutory, Congressionally-mandated task to address the sufficiency of OSHA and EPA regulations. That is a key obligation of the CSB and I intend to continue pursuing this mandate vigorously,” and that OSHA’s response to seven (yes… SEVEN) open recommendations is quite simply “Unacceptable”.

The open recommendations cover the aforementioned combustible dust issues, which accounts for 4 of the 7 recommendations and which CSB has deemed the highest priority as well as the 3 following issues:

-Recommendation to ensure coverage under the Process Safety Management (PSM) standard for atmospheric storage tanks that could be involved in a potential catastrophic release as a result of being interconnected to a covered process with 10,000 pounds of a flammable substance. The recommendation was issued in 2002 following the CSB’s investigation of a 2001 explosion of a poorly maintained, corroded storage tank containing  spent sulfuric acid and flammable hydrocarbons at the Motiva refinery  in  Delaware City, Delaware. A worker was conducting hot work which ignited vapor through holes in the deteriorated tank. 
 
– Recommendation to revise the PSM standard to require management of change (MOC) reviews for organizational changes such as mergers and acquisitions that may impact process safety.  This recommendation, issued in 2007, followed the 2005 explosions and fire at the BP Texas City refinery which killed 15 workers and injured 180 others.     
 
– Recommendation that OSHA issue a fuel gas safety standard for construction and general industry. This recommendation, issued in June 2010 followed two catastrophic accidents that occurred that year: In one, an explosion caused a roof collapse at the ConAgra Slim Jim facility in Garner, North Carolina, killing four workers and injuring 67 others. A worker had been attempting to purge new natural gas piping during the installation of an industrial water heater, resulting in a large release of natural gas indoors. In the other, at the Kleen Energy power plant in Middletown, Connecticut, high pressure natural gas was being used to clean new piping and was released in a congested outdoor area. It  ignited, killing six workers and injuring at least 50.   
Chairperson Moure-Eraso further said, “The Board has called on OSHA a number of times over the past several years to act on this known, insidious hazard that continues to claim the lives of workers and cause enormous damage and loss of jobs. It’s critical that OSHA address the recommendations.”
Read the complete statement by the CSB



Top 50 Causes of Death in the US

Top 50 Causes of Death in the USA according to http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com

Rank Cause Deaths %
1 Coronary Heart Disease
445,864
21.42
2 Alzheimers/Dementia
172,765
8.3
3 Lung Cancers
165,402
7.95
4 Stroke
146,664
7.05
5 Lung Disease
130,808
6.29
6 Diabetes Mellitus
75,280
3.62
7 Colon-Rectum Cancers
62,592
3.01
8 Hypertension
62,156
2.99
9 Influenza & Pneumonia
57,722
2.77
10 Kidney Disease
50,889
2.45
11 Breast Cancer
47,377
2.28
12 Road Traffic Accidents
45,154
2.17
13 Lymphomas
38,595
1.85
14 Pancreas Cancer
35,715
1.72
15 Suicide
35,441
1.7
16 Prostate Cancer
34,299
1.65
17 Inflammatory/Heart
33,885
1.63
18 Endocrine Disorders
33,697
1.62
19 Liver Disease
30,027
1.44
20 Poisonings
29,473
1.42
21 Other Injuries
25,827
1.24
22 Leukemia
25,443
1.22
23 Falls
24,337
1.17
24 Parkinson Disease
21,557
1.04
25 Violence
19,169
0.92
26 Liver Cancer
17,862
0.86
27 Bladder Cancer
16,279
0.78
28 Oesophagus Cancer
15,710
0.75
29 Ovary Cancer
15,254
0.73
30 Other Neoplasms
15,145
0.73
31 Stomach Cancer
13,230
0.64
32 Skin Cancers
13,036
0.63
33 Congenital Anomalies
11,835
0.57
34 HIV/AIDS
11,630
0.56
35 Oral Cancer
9,330
0.45
36 Uterin Cancer
8,638
0.42
37 Low Birth Weight
7,748
0.37
38 Diarrhoeal diseases
7,298
0.35
39 Hepatitis C
6,764
0.33
40 Alcohol
6,230
0.3
41 Drug Use
4,732
0.23
42 Cervical Cancer
4,564
0.22
43 Skin Disease
4,147
0.2
44 Multiple Sclerosis
3,738
0.18
45 Asthma
3,653
0.18
46 Drownings
3,599
0.17
47 Fires
3,463
0.17
48 Rheumatic Heart Disease
3,401
0.16
49 Peptic Ulcer Disease
3,209
0.15
50 Anaemia
3,059
0.15

(Source: http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/country-health-profile/united-states)


Safety Tips for Crowded Venues

I don’t know a parent who hasn’t experienced it, that sinking feeling when you suddenly realize that you can’t see your child and don’t know where he or she has gotten to.

“He was here a second ago! How far could he have gotten?”

Fortunately, the child is usually found fairly rapidly but such isn’t always the case.

So how do we take our children out in public, especially in crowds, and still make sure that they are going to be safe?

We can’t guarantee that something won’t happen, but we can take some measures to keep them as safe as possible by following a few simple safety precautions.

1. Make sure that they are wearing easily identifiable clothing that is bright and easy to spot, even from a distance away. A bright yellow shirt is easier to spot in a crowd than a dull grey one. Add other identifiable accessories (brightly covered hair accessories, arm bands, reflective stripes, etc…) that’ll help you see them quickly when scanning a crowd for a child that was “there a second ago”!

2. Have identification on your child. List the child’s name, blood type, any emergency medical information as well as your contact information, a contact number for someone who is at another loacation (an aunt, grandparents, etc…) so that if they can get a hold of you they can still get a hold of someone who can help get your child home). https://ice4safety.com/purchase/ has a variety of products that are waterproof and can’t help you make sure that your child has, on him or her, all the information needed to help anyone who finds your child able to contact you.

3. If possible, get a cell phone for each child and teach them how to use it to call you if they get separated. Put your number in speed dial and show them how to dial it. Make sure they know how to answer the phone in case you are calling them. Make sure it’s in a zip up pocket or something similar where it won’t fall out.

4. Use the camera in the phone to take pictures. Take a picture of yourself for the phone that’s going to be in the child’s possession and take a photo of each of your children for yours. Take it right before you leave so that it shows the clothing they are wearing. This will make it a lot easier to the police to identify and spot your child if they need to search for him or her.

5. Make a plan ahead of time. Set up a rendez-vous point and make sure that your kids know where it is, where they will know to go if they get lost. Get down on their level to make sure they can see the landmark that you’ve designated. Make sure they understand how to get there and that they are supposed to wait there until you get there (Parents often tell kids to go to a meeting place without understanding that the child thinks the parent will be there when they get there and panic when the parent isn’t. Make sure they understand that they may get there before you do and that if that happens, they need to wait).

6. Make sure that your children know who is safe to approach for help when they are lost. Teach them what a police officer or a security guard looks like. Teach them to ask for help from someone behind a counter in a place of business if they can’t find a policeman. Make sure, however, that they understand to ask for help from a woman in this case, rather than a man (predators are typically men who are by themselves).

Make sure that you children understand to call first, to go to a meet-up spot second, etc… and they will hopefully not need to ask for help from a stranger. Teach them to look determined and walk with a purpose, not confused and lost which would draw the attention of a predator.

Kids are small. They can easily get separated in a sea of legs and follow the wrong pair of legs thinking they are still following their parent or guardian. Keep them close, especially when the crowd gets more dense. Hold their hand or carry them when possible. Failing that, however, having a backup plan to help you reconnect with your child as soon as possible if the unthinkable should happen is essential. A little foresight and preparation can turn a “uh oh!” moment from becoming a “Oh! NO!” one.

 

 

 



ShockFusion Horizontal Lifeline Selection Guide

Need a rooftop safety lifeline system but not sure what’ll work best for your own particular application?

Miller’s ShockFusion online selection guide is the answer. Simply put it walks you through the different variables:

  1. Roof Type
  2. Attachment kit
  3. System Length
  4. Connecting Device
  5. # of Workers and Span
  6. Connecting Device Length
  7. Fall Clearance

and the app will create a detailed list that you can download to submit for approval. It will also give you the part number of the complete kit.

ShockFusion

In addition, it will create a diagram to show you exactly how to install the system (like the one below).

diagram

Take it for a spin yourself at https://www.millerfallprotection.com/shockfusionkits/

 


Quit raining wrenches on your co-workers: An objects-at-heights webinar

From Ergodyne:

Event Date: 07/24/2013 12:00 PM Central Daylight Time

Aerial safety goes beyond standard fall protection. When you have a “butterfinger” type of day (and we’ve all had ’em), the tools and equipment you rely on can quickly turn into plummeting little (or big) bombs of destruction. In the past, objects-at-heights hazard-planning has been an afterthought – or not even a thought. Today, regulators and professionals acknowledge the serious, life-threatening risks of falling objects and are instilling rules to ensure proper precautions are followed in the workplace. This webinar will address:

  • Objects-at-heights safety and how it is part of safety-at-heights planning
  • Costs of dropped objects and other objects-at-heights hazards
  • Best practice for objects at heights within the Hierarchy of Controls

Register for the Quit Raining Wrenches on Your Co-workers: An Objects at Heights Webinar